Author Topic: Static hold exercise routine  (Read 1472 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

CR Williams

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1456
    • In Shadow In Light
  • Location: Central Alabama
Static hold exercise routine
« on: August 31, 2015, 04:59:11 PM »
I'm going to describe how I currently do this. You should adjust it as you will as far as what you do and how long you do it and rest times and the like. The important thing is not how I do this as much as what I am doing and why.

I have a HIT timer on my phone that I can set to run a chosen number of cycles, each consisting of an exercise period and a rest period. It has a preparation time set before the cycles start to let me get in position and get whatever I need for a given exercise. I have it currently set for a thirty-second exercise period and a twenty-second rest. Then it starts another one until the total count is run or I stop it.

I bring out a pistol, a rifle, and one of the bag guns (ASP or 30DMG or AK-P or AK-R) and set them in reach. I start the timer and perform the following static holds in sequence:

Pistol, two hand, full extension (x2, switching sides second time)
Pistol, one hand, full extension (x2, switching sides)
Rifle x2, switching sides between
Bag gun, cheek weld, x2, switching sides between
Horse stance (currently 1 time, will add a second round in a week or two)
Pushup position plank x2

I will then repeat this cycle - so far, 3 times. Depending on how I progress I will add more cycles as time goes by.

I do my best to set and maintain an absolutely correct position for thirty seconds. I use the sights on the pistol but do work the peripheral vision while I'm holding. I check to make sure the trigger finger can move freely and that the grip is solid. Rifle and bag guns I run target focus through the red dot and work peripheral vision and keep everything in nice and tight. I also check trigger finger movement.

Horse stance and pushup-position plank are there to help with foundation and core.

It's not as easy as it may seem to hold a static position like this, so start small and build up if you're not doing something similar. By the end of the second cycle I'm sweating and muscles are trembling.

This is my off-day exercise routine. Other days it's either barbell and dumbbell or kettlebell work.

I believe this kind of work will help me maintain consistency and quality during range sessions. Try it and see if it helps you the same way.
Shikan haramitsu dai ko myo.

In Shadow In Light - Studying and advancing the art and the science of the fight.

www.inshadowinlight.com

M1911A1

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3668
  • Location: I'm at the far upper left-hand corner of the US.
Re: Static hold exercise routine
« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2015, 08:17:35 PM »
...And, speaking of disagreeing with you:

I was taught that short periods of exercise are better for one's (mythical) muscle memory, since exercising to fatigue actually teaches one to avoid exercise.

Thus, when I worked with students, my advice was to practice one thing only, each session, and to practice that one thing for no more than about 10 minutes.
Given enough time during the day, one might put in three or four widely-spaced, 10-minute practice sessions, each one about only one "topic." But one practice session a day was quite enough, if it was done every day without fail.

It seems to me that you are advocating too many "topics," and too long a practice session.
Your regimen is good for an expert perhaps, but, I believe, much too much for a "mere" student.
Steve,
retired leathersmith and practical shooter


"Qui desiderat pacem, pręparet bellum."

CR Williams

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1456
    • In Shadow In Light
  • Location: Central Alabama
Re: Static hold exercise routine
« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2015, 05:40:56 AM »
I find this a touch confusing, Steve. Stance, structure, grip are fundamental. Elements of stance go across platforms. I'm assuming a static position for thirty seconds at a time. There are six minutes of actual exercise in this list. Adding the rest periods and the 20 second preparatory period the app provides me adds a little over four minutes if I add it right. So total from start to finish currently for one cycle runs about 11 minutes, 33 for all three so far done if I get the two on that I'm only doing one of now. Of that, all you're doing is holding a position for 18 minutes spaced over that period.

This is not meant to be training as much as conditioning. This is not a learning exercise here. It can be considered a practice exercise but the emphasis is conditioning. You yourself have recommended static holds of weights as a condition exercise for shooters. This is a variation of that in essence.

So I'm not sure I see the source of the disagreement. Probably why I'm puzzled.
Shikan haramitsu dai ko myo.

In Shadow In Light - Studying and advancing the art and the science of the fight.

www.inshadowinlight.com

M1911A1

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3668
  • Location: I'm at the far upper left-hand corner of the US.
Re: Static hold exercise routine
« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2015, 03:58:48 PM »
Well, it just seemed to me to be too lengthy an exercise for newer students.
That's all.

Since the total time is 33 minutes, I would tell a fairly new student to break it down into three segments, at least an hour apart.
Steve,
retired leathersmith and practical shooter


"Qui desiderat pacem, pręparet bellum."

CR Williams

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1456
    • In Shadow In Light
  • Location: Central Alabama
Re: Static hold exercise routine
« Reply #4 on: September 02, 2015, 05:28:46 AM »
"You should adjust it as you will as far as what you do and how long you do it and rest times and the like."

This is the danger of using yourself as an example, I guess. Somebody takes it as the mandate for the routine.

One cycle, all the things in one cycle, two cycles, don't do everything, doesn't matter. Understand the concept and intent and modify it to your wants and desires and requirements. That's what matters.
Shikan haramitsu dai ko myo.

In Shadow In Light - Studying and advancing the art and the science of the fight.

www.inshadowinlight.com

M1911A1

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3668
  • Location: I'm at the far upper left-hand corner of the US.
Re: Static hold exercise routine
« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2015, 02:27:54 PM »
OK, Richard, I withdraw my objection...in this case.
Steve,
retired leathersmith and practical shooter


"Qui desiderat pacem, pręparet bellum."

oldranger53

  • The Ranger Creed-words to live by
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3725
  • 2/503d INF ABN 173d BDE ABN
    • Temporary website home with basic information.
Re: Static hold exercise routine
« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2015, 06:02:55 PM »
Holy Crap, CR!
You actually DO that stuff?

I haven't read all the replies, since I just got home...etc...

If you actually DO all that stuff, on a regular basis, my hat's off to you!

That's all I got for now.
Never shall I fail my comrades. I will always keep myself mentally alert, physically strong and morally straight, and I will shoulder more than my share of the task whatever it may be.  One hundred percent and then some.

CR Williams

  • Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1456
    • In Shadow In Light
  • Location: Central Alabama
Re: Static hold exercise routine
« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2015, 05:30:59 AM »
Holy Crap, CR!
You actually DO that stuff?

I started with one cycle and have been adding parts and cycles since, oldranger. It's like any other conditioning routine I do. I start everything relatively small-scale and add on over time while I monitor effects as best I can the old-fashioned way--how well I can maintain form and how it feels during and for a while afterwards.

The nebulous goal right now is to work up to five cycles.

Right now it's not as hard as when I was trying to work up to a 20-minute pushup plank per Sonny Puzika's recommendation in his 'The Forge' conditioning video. I think I got as far as eight minutes or a touch better. That was an effort, I'm here to tell you.

Static holds have been a part of martial arts conditioning for ages and things like the regular plank and its variants are currently considered to be very good core conditioning exercises. All I'm really doing is adapting that to shooters. The idea probably came from my current thinking about structure that I have to do for the book I'm working on and the back-of-the-mind memory of this: http://weaponsman.com/?p=18416.

I will say that this is more for shooting from static positions (even momentary ones) than on the move as I prefer and would be most likely to default to in reactive fights. Other than that, so far I'm keeping up and feel that it would be useful to others to try for themselves.
Shikan haramitsu dai ko myo.

In Shadow In Light - Studying and advancing the art and the science of the fight.

www.inshadowinlight.com