Author Topic: LA Knife Bill provides clear definition  (Read 1526 times)

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oldranger53

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Re: LA Knife Bill provides clear definition
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2012, 05:03:07 PM »
Hummm, I have a switchblade knife.  It is about 3" overall when opened.  I found it in a desk drawer some years ago while cleaning out an old building.
These days I use it to open Sunday School supply boxes, cut tape ends, and generally hang on a lanyard about my neck along with a mini flashlight and my key to the church we attend.
I've found it very useful when I have to hold something with one hand, tape with the other, and then cut the end of the tape rather than pull-tear the tape off.


I've always wondered why the "switchblade" has such an evil rapport, when they really don't have any real tactical value for hurting someone, in my opinion.
It really is FUN to push the button and have the cute little blade spring out and make that "click" sound - but hey, is it deserving of controlled status?


All serious knives I've ever seen have NOT been switchblades, so why all the fuss?
I'm not being glib, if there's an answer I'd really like to know!


Happy Sunday!!
Never shall I fail my comrades. I will always keep myself mentally alert, physically strong and morally straight, and I will shoulder more than my share of the task whatever it may be.  One hundred percent and then some.

Coastie

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Re: LA Knife Bill provides clear definition
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2012, 10:16:54 PM »
As I've read on this forum the reason most states have laws against switchblades is because of the play/movie 'West Side Story."  Which is a little outdated it first being shown in the early 60s.  One thing you may not know is that self-openers as they're being called today are readily for those involved in EMS, LE or even vets.  www.galls.com has numerous models of them for sale.  S&W is one manufacturer who makes them. 

I have a WWII switchblade that paratroopers carried.  It is orange with brass button and button lock so it won't open accidentally.  One end has a switchblade knife blade which pops out at the push of a button and on the other end is a razor sharp hook that one can pull out like any pocket knife.  That hook was used to cut through parachute cord if one was caught up in a tree or steeple.  Although it was issued in the 40s?, it is still good as new. 


For meaning, try a state law search to see what justification there is...

oldranger53

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LA Knife Bill provides clear definition
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2012, 10:35:47 PM »
Thanks Coastie!
I used to keep a fixed blade "hook knife" attached to my equipment when acting as jumpmaster, long ago. My purpose was to be able to cut away a jumper from the aircraft in case the static line did not deploy and the jumper was towed behind the aircraft.
I never had to use it for that, glad to say.
Thanks for reminding me of that. It's been a long time!

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Never shall I fail my comrades. I will always keep myself mentally alert, physically strong and morally straight, and I will shoulder more than my share of the task whatever it may be.  One hundred percent and then some.