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31
All the Rest of the Weapons / Re: Windham Weaponry R20FFTM-308 Review
« Last post by flyover on October 14, 2018, 07:12:32 AM »
I would really like to own one of those rifles but like you say, they are expensive. I should not complain as I have a 308 in a bolt rifle, a CAI frankenFAL (LA1A) and a Springfield M1A Match rifle.
32
Handguns & Holsters / Re: Black Powder Shooting - Powder Selections
« Last post by M1911A1 on October 13, 2018, 01:26:11 PM »
...I hope to start making my own lubricated patches, as that would cut down on the cost somewhat.  It really depends on how much it cuts down on the cost over buying pre-lubed patches...

I only used home-made, pre-lubricated patches in a rifle when I was hunting.

I was privileged in that my leather shop boasted lots of different-size leather punches, the larger round ones being perfect for making rifle patches.

The first problem is finding out how large the patch has to be. It shouldn't be too large...or too small. My sizing technique was to use a sheet of patch material, to start a ball through it, and then to cut the material off at the muzzle with a patch knife. Then I pulled the ball (and eventually re-melted and re-cast it) and measured the patch I'd made.
Then I found the correct punch to make a patch as close to that size as I could manage. I prefer cast-steel arch punches, even though they're very expensive, because they are essentially permanent. Also, they're easy to sharpen (outside only) with emery cloth.
A good-quality punch should be used only by cutting through the cloth into end-grain wood. Otherwise, you'll quickly ruin the punch. And use a mallet (rawhide or wood), not a hammer.

Nowadays, there's probably lots better lubricant than the "bear grease" that I used.
33
Handguns & Holsters / Re: Black Powder Shooting - Powder Selections
« Last post by M1911A1 on October 13, 2018, 01:09:09 PM »
...I...like the idea of using a cartridge to make [wads], and I have plenty of used .45 Colt cases to use for the .44. I would think that a used .38 or .357 case could be used for the .36...

Yes. That ought to work.

Paraffin is very malleable. If the wad is a bit too small in diameter, pressing the ball down onto it will spread it out. If it's a bit too big, it'll still stuff into a chamber under thumb pressure.
The graphite powder (door-lock lubricant) serves only to keep unused wads from sticking together, but in a warm climate it's only moderately successful over time. My old, unused wads (from more than 25 years ago) are now stuck together, and require pressure from a fingernail to separate 'em.

The advantage of paraffin wads over pre-lubricated fiber is that paraffin won't ever leach into the powder charge. I worry that the fiber-wad's lubricant will eventually ruin a shot.
34
Everything Else / Re: Facebook Censorship!!!
« Last post by Taurian on October 13, 2018, 12:13:04 PM »
Same here - no Facebook for this old man. But, there are some addicted to it, and way too many, in my opinion.
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Everything Else / Re: Just checking to see who is payong attention!
« Last post by RayMich on October 13, 2018, 11:55:54 AM »
If God didn't want us to eat animals, why did he make them out of meat?

I am a second hand vegetarian. Cow eat grass, I eat cows. End of story!  ;D 
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Everything Else / Re: Facebook Censorship!!!
« Last post by NorCalChuck on October 13, 2018, 11:30:59 AM »
Since I do not do facebook  . . . . . . enough said about that . . . . . .
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Everything Else / Facebook Censorship!!!
« Last post by Taurian on October 13, 2018, 07:48:46 AM »
Facebook Purge: Here Is The List Of Pages Deleted By Facebook:

https://www.westernjournal.com/facebook-purge-list-pages-deleted/?utm_source=Email&utm_medium=WJBreaking&utm_campaign=breaking&utm_content=western-journal

You just might see some of your favorites listed, or no longer see them on Facebook.
38
Handguns & Holsters / Re: Black Powder Shooting - Powder Selections
« Last post by Taurian on October 13, 2018, 04:31:03 AM »
I haven't warmed up to percussion revolvers just yet, although I do have a Pietta Colt Navy "Griswald and Gunnerson" replica in .36 caliber waiting to be shot.  The 'Gris" has an all brass frame.  I am planning on adding a Uberti "London" in .36 caliber and the Uberti Remington 1858 Army in .44 caliber at some point. But, and for now, I am concentrating on single-shot percussion pistols. I found two "must haves" that will be added when I can afford them. Both are Pedersoli pistols that are fine examples of the pistols used in the mid-1700 to mid 1800s.

I like your "patch work," Steve. Right now, I am just using pre-lubricated patches for the pistols and have some pre-lubricated wads for the .36. I also like the idea of using a cartridge to make them, and I have plenty of used .45 Colt cases to use for the .44. I would think that a used .38 or .357 case could be used for the .36?

I hope to start making my own lubricated patches, as that would cut down on the cost somewhat.  It really depends on how much it cuts down on the cost over buying pre-lubed patches.

Lots to learn.
39
Handguns & Holsters / Re: Black Powder Shooting - Powder Selections
« Last post by M1911A1 on October 12, 2018, 10:34:21 PM »
Hot water (and soap) also removes mercuric residues left by corrosive primers. Urine is not necessary.

Also, if the water is hot enough, it self-dries the metal it's been used on.

I have no experience cleaning black-powder firearms with anything but soap and water. The preparations in use nowadays were not available when I was actively shooting muzzleloaders and caplock revolvers.

When I loaded a revolver, I would place a 1/8"-thick, pre-cut disk of graphite-coated paraffin between the powder and the ball. The paraffin sealed the chamber against chain-firing, and also against water, and it helped to keep the resultant powder fouling soft.
I made these disks by pouring melted paraffin into a shallow griddle-pan to make it an even thickness, dusting the surface with graphite so it wouldn't stick to itself, and then cutting the disks with an old .45 "Long" Colt cartridge case from which I'd removed the head. Just press the case down and twist. The disks accumulated in the Colt case, stacked, and finally came out the open top. Then I added more graphite by tumbling the disks gently, by hand, in a can.
If it was actually raining (rare in Southern California), I rubbed a little "bear grease" (home-extracted tallow mixed with Vaseline) around the cap, to seal the nipple too.

That same "bear grease" was my patch lubricant for loads which sat for a long time in my hunting muzzleloaders. But if the bullet was to be shot right away, spit was good enough.

BTW: If you bottle very pure tallow and let it rot, the result is excellent glycerin, which is a really good tap and die lubricant.
40
Handguns & Holsters / Re: Black Powder Shooting - Powder Selections
« Last post by Taurian on October 12, 2018, 04:03:12 PM »
Going to Bass Pro Shops tomorrow to see if they have Pyrodex RS. Pyrodex P seemed to do well int eh Traditions "Kentucky" percussion pistol - and I get o see how well it will do in the Traditions "Trapper" in the same caliber (.50 caliber).

I just ordered a Traditions “Plains Hawken” rifle in the same caliber with a 28” barrel. That one will use the Pyrodex RS.

Personally, I found that it does not take a lot of effort to get them clean, although it more than what is called for in modern firearms. I used the 'Moose Milk" mixture and hot soapy water. Then, follow up with a heat gun for drying and lubricated patches for protection. So far, so good. I am also meticulous about swabbing the barrel out after each shot, and that's something our ancestors did not have time to do during fighting off the British, Indians, and Northern Invaders.

I am curious, though. With the Mosin-Nagant, shooting surplus ammo was highly corrosive, as is Black Powder and Pyrodex.  The cure for preventive corrosion during the war was to urinate down the barrel, from which the the ammonia removed the corrosive effects of the primers.  The more modern, and less embarrassing at the range, is to spray Windex (with ammonia) down the barrel to counter the corrosive affects of the primer. I would think that the same principle would apply to corrosive powders like black powder and Pyrodex. But, I can't find anything to verify that.

Being a newbie to the sport of black powder shooting, I probably will be over-thinking and over-doing stuff until I found out that I don't need to.

What does surprise me is that powder could stay in a barrel that long and still shoot.

L.E. Joe, I think that you are more high-tech than you are letting on. Spatulas have been around  longer than both of us.
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