Author Topic: Test Your Survival Shooting Skills  (Read 1033 times)

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Taurian

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Test Your Survival Shooting Skills
« on: December 16, 2015, 04:43:59 AM »
While I don't have access to a 50-yard range, most of the drills in the article I can practice (on top of my usual drills).

Each line at the indoor range has a ledge where you lay your shooting gear. I can use this ledge to simulate cover and shoot over the ledge (while kneeling) for the 15-yard and 25-yard drills. Now, where did I put those knee pads?

http://www.downrange.tv/blog/test-your-survival-shooting-skills/36223/
What most 21st Century Americans simply do not grasp is that the Constitution and Bill of Rights were not written to to give rights to the citizens of our then-new nation, but was instead written to tightly constrain the federal government.

M1911A1

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Re: Test Your Survival Shooting Skills
« Reply #1 on: December 16, 2015, 03:05:12 PM »
Hmmm...
My survival skills must be somewhat different.

My Rules:
1. If it's further than 90 yards, I have time to get my rifle, or, better yet, to evade and escape.
2. If it's further than 50 yards, I'd better have my rifle, or have practiced running through the tall grass.*
3. If it's at 20 yards or further, I go prone, especially with a pistol.
4. Kneeling and sitting are wastes of time, unless there's something in the way of your prone position.

*At my age? I must be joking! (Yes, I am.)
Steve,
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"Qui desiderat pacem, pręparet bellum."

Taurian

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Re: Test Your Survival Shooting Skills
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2015, 08:43:15 AM »
Hmmm...
My survival skills must be somewhat different.

My Rules:
1. If it's further than 90 yards, I have time to get my rifle, or, better yet, to evade and escape.
2. If it's further than 50 yards, I'd better have my rifle, or have practiced running through the tall grass.*
3. If it's at 20 yards or further, I go prone, especially with a pistol.
4. Kneeling and sitting are wastes of time, unless there's something in the way of your prone position.

*At my age? I must be joking! (Yes, I am.)

  • Agree + a solid prone-out (depends on situation)
  • Agree
  • Low crouch for me (so far) - may need assistance getting up. I guess that I need to get back to doing lunges.
  • Will definitely need assistance getting up from prone.  Getting up from kneeling position is questionable.
There is very limited (line) space at the indoor range that I frequent. Going prone is not an option, although I can get by with kneeling.

Also, the targets are not moving,  they are not scampering from cover to cover, and they are not shooting - they are static. 

And, as CR's BBG course brought out in Day 2, living targets are three dimensional.  A hunter tries to wait for a broadside shot on an animal, because they know where the 8-inch sweet spot is and is best reached when the animal is still and broadside to the hunter.

In a defensive shooting situation, the target may present itself at many, and dynamic, angles. Attempting a CNS shot is darn near impossible. However, the odds of stopping the fight are more in your favor with  head shots from any angle.

My "Mozambique Drill" is a little different; Three rounds CM, two rounds H, three rounds CM, reload (assuming I am running the 1911 or a pistol with a capacity greater then 8+1).  I always try to force myself into a reload and will run the drill (when I can remember to) with a near-full (or near empty, if you prefer) magazine that forces me into a reload to complete the drill.

If I am running the Springfield XDs, with a lesser round count, I can still accomplish the first two steps (3  CM, 2 H) and go for the reload.

With a (6-round) revolver or Glock G36 (6-round, assuming a stock magazine is used), the first two steps still leave one round chambered.  Even with a 5-shot revolver, the first two steps can be accomplished - and then a reload (I recommend speed loaders, with the Safariland being my preference).

Most ranges do not allow for a lot of movement. Of course, there is a reason for that - liability and shooter safety. Some ranges don't even allow for a lot of movement within a lane; again, for shooter safety and liability reasons.  We may have to train dictated by the confines of our environment, how narrow or expansive they may be.

While target shooting is fun, carrying a firearm to the fight is an entirely different world.  I had to bring myself back to the reality of why I carry, the BBG course did that for me. For some, the reality needs to unfold itself for the first time. The award for a competitive shooter might be points or even a trophy or certificate. For a defensive shooter (or counter-offensive if you prefer) the reward just might be life and I'll take that over a store-bought trophy any day.  But, I digress.

I believe that the "Mozambique Drill" (either in standard or my modified format) and reloading under pressure is one of the most important drills one can master.  I am trying to break myself of the bad habit of not watching the target as I perform a reload. I fell into this habit because of competition and it is not conducive to surviving in the real world. I also have to force myself into a high-ready position when doing so.  Revolvers and pistols have different reloading techniques and I feel that I need to be competent in both although the pistol is my preferred carry.

If you really want an eye-opener, try running the "Mozambique Drill" with a single-action revolver; You really appreciate what we have available to us today in regards to handguns.

Anyway, the drills have been presented and practice as you may - but practice, please.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2015, 02:58:42 PM by Taurian »
What most 21st Century Americans simply do not grasp is that the Constitution and Bill of Rights were not written to to give rights to the citizens of our then-new nation, but was instead written to tightly constrain the federal government.

M1911A1

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Re: Test Your Survival Shooting Skills
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2015, 01:26:34 PM »
A Coupla Notes:
1. In a semi-auto reload, bring the pistol up, right in front of your face. That way, you can watch the threat and watch the reload go in, all at the same time. (I haven't the slightest idea how to do something similar with a revolver, since there's a lot more gun-rotational manipulation involved.)
2. Just for fun, since he was low in the hustings already, a friend once ran The Cooper Assault course with a reproduction Colt's percussion revolver. His reload was necessarily pretty slow, since he had to disassemble the gun in order to install a fresh cylinder, but he made all of his hits, and his time (minus the reload) was quite creditable.
Steve,
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"Qui desiderat pacem, pręparet bellum."

oldranger53

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Re: Test Your Survival Shooting Skills
« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2015, 01:47:40 PM »
I haven't followed the link or read all the posts in this thread...so my opinion means even less than usual.

Wait...uh...which thread am I reading anyways?

<Sent from phone. Typos possible.>

Never shall I fail my comrades. I will always keep myself mentally alert, physically strong and morally straight, and I will shoulder more than my share of the task whatever it may be.  One hundred percent and then some.

Taurian

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Re: Test Your Survival Shooting Skills
« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2015, 02:16:03 PM »
A Coupla Notes:
1. In a semi-auto reload, bring the pistol up, right in front of your face. That way, you can watch the threat and watch the reload go in, all at the same time. (I haven't the slightest idea how to do something similar with a revolver, since there's a lot more gun-rotational manipulation involved.)
2. Just for fun, since he was low in the hustings already, a friend once ran The Cooper Assault course with a reproduction Colt's percussion revolver. His reload was necessarily pretty slow, since he had to disassemble the gun in order to install a fresh cylinder, but he made all of his hits, and his time (minus the reload) was quite creditable.

  • I'll give that a try. I'm usually holding the pistol upward and slightly left to get to the magazine release button while the left hand goes for the spare magazine. It seems that I just need to move the pistol more in front of the face than to the side while keeping the eyes on the prize.  I will practice that the next range session (or actually in the bedroom with a safe pistol. The dropped mags can fall on the bed where they won't be damaged).
  • That had to be tricky. With the Remington, the cylinder could be removed without disassembling the whole revolver (the 1858 Remington New Army was the revolver Eastwood used in the movie "Pale Rider"). The cylinder pin could be pushed out to the front of the revolver, which would release the cylinder. With the early Colt Open-Top revolver conversions; however, a wedge had to be knocked out of the barrel assembly, the barrel assembly removed, the cylinder removed, and a new cylinder installed.  Then, it was install the barrel assembly and knock the wedge back into place. Even though they were conversions, the loading port was still available, as they were originally used to install the cup on each chamber.  With a true percussion revolver, it was probably faster to do a cylinder swap than to load each individual chamber with either the Remington or the Colt.  Both were fascinating revolvers.
What most 21st Century Americans simply do not grasp is that the Constitution and Bill of Rights were not written to to give rights to the citizens of our then-new nation, but was instead written to tightly constrain the federal government.

Taurian

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Re: Test Your Survival Shooting Skills
« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2015, 02:23:53 PM »
I haven't followed the link or read all the posts in this thread...so my opinion means even less than usual.

Wait...uh...which thread am I reading anyways?

<Sent from phone. Typos possible.>



Pay attention because this is important stuff and we don't want you feeling left out, which incidentally, is the position in baseball that I usually played.
What most 21st Century Americans simply do not grasp is that the Constitution and Bill of Rights were not written to to give rights to the citizens of our then-new nation, but was instead written to tightly constrain the federal government.

oldranger53

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Re: Test Your Survival Shooting Skills
« Reply #7 on: December 17, 2015, 02:42:54 PM »
Ok...I got lost when the pistol pointed at my face part surfaced.

I noticed that there were times when I pushed the mag release button that the muzzle was fearfully close to my own muzzle...of sorts.

I've since revised my reload procedure to disallow any muzzle pointing at my own muzzle...so to speak...ugh. ok...I'm ok now...I'm think.

<Sent from phone. Typos possible.>

Never shall I fail my comrades. I will always keep myself mentally alert, physically strong and morally straight, and I will shoulder more than my share of the task whatever it may be.  One hundred percent and then some.

M1911A1

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Re: Test Your Survival Shooting Skills
« Reply #8 on: December 17, 2015, 02:56:52 PM »
I'll try to describe my reload technique, which is based upon use of the M1911A1.
(This is not my own idea. I was taught it by my mentor, Mike Harries.)

I shoot, normally, using both hands in the modified Weaver position. I also count my shots (if I'm not in a panic), so my reload takes place after my seventh shot. Otherwise, in a panic, I shoot to slide-lock...but the technique still works.

• The right hand retains the pistol, but its grip loosens slightly. The left hand slides upwards and forwards, about halfway to the pistol's muzzle.
• The left hand presses toward my body, against the flat side of the slide. This rotates the pistol in my right hand, just enough to bring my thumb directly onto the magazine release.
• While all this is going on, I move the pistol to directly in front of my face, the entrance to the magazine well at eye level. Both hands are still on the pistol.
• My left hand presses the pistol toward my face, while the right thumb presses away from my body on the magazine release. That will always release the magazine. In my pistols, the magazine will always drop free and fall to the ground.
• As the empty magazine falls free, my left hand dives right onto the reload at my belt level. The magazine is in a holder with the bullet ends of the cartridges facing forward. My left forefinger lays along the length of the front of the magazine, while I grip the reload by pinching thumb and second finger together on it. I pull the reload up, and out of its holder.
• My left hand flips the reload around so that it's pointing upward, ready to be inserted. As the reload approaches the pistol's magazine well, I "look it in," making sure that it enters correctly. (All of my pistols have chamfered magazine wells.) The reload moves to the gun. The gun doesn't move.
• Once the entry has begun, my fingers spread away from the reload, and the palm-pad below my thumb slams the magazine into place. In a M1911, this always works. The magazine does not go in too far, and it always locks into place.
• My left hand moves up to the inner flat side of the slide, and pushes the pistol around and forward. My right hand resumes its firing grip as my left hand resumes its original position, wrapped around my right hand. The gun's sights are already at eye level, so as soon as everything is tight, I can fire my next shot.

Back when I was competing, this entire process took less than 1 1/2 seconds; sometimes it was close to a second. Nowadays, I'm much slower: Last shot to first shot is a bit more than 1 1/2 seconds, and sometimes more than two.
If I've shot to slide-lock, I usually press the slide release with my left thumb while I am resuming my firing grip. Doing this takes longer, but it always works.

I dunno whether this technique will work with non-M1911 guns.
Try it, and tell me about it.
Steve,
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"Qui desiderat pacem, pręparet bellum."

Taurian

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Re: Test Your Survival Shooting Skills
« Reply #9 on: December 17, 2015, 03:06:07 PM »
...I usually press the slide release with my left thumb while I am resuming my firing grip. Doing this takes longer, but it always works.

Running the slide lock with the left hand is something that I do on occasion. I like it better than running the slide lock with my right thumb since the left thumb is already in that vicinity anyway. Plus, I can work the slide lock lever when the pistol is in the firing position as it is being thrust forward to the target.  I can't really tell if doing the slide lock this way is any slower or faster than using the thumb of the shooting hand.
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Re: Test Your Survival Shooting Skills
« Reply #10 on: December 17, 2015, 05:35:31 PM »
No, no, no...
It's not that using one thumb is slower than using the other.
It's that using the slide lock with either thumb is slower than leaving one unfired cartridge "up the spout" during a reload.

I know that in a competition for which I've practiced, leaving one "up the spout" is easy.
But in a save-your-life panic, I'm certain that it's not.
Steve,
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"Qui desiderat pacem, pręparet bellum."

Taurian

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Re: Test Your Survival Shooting Skills
« Reply #11 on: December 17, 2015, 06:04:50 PM »
No, no, no...
It's not that using one thumb is slower than using the other.
It's that using the slide lock with either thumb is slower than leaving one unfired cartridge "up the spout" during a reload.

I know that in a competition for which I've practiced, leaving one "up the spout" is easy.
But in a save-your-life panic, I'm certain that it's not.

I misunderstood you.  I agree that leaving one in the spout is the "fastest" way to go. And, like you say, that may not be the case in a real life situation.  This is also the reason that I like to train with mixed capacity magazines.  I'll load five or six magazines the day before I go to the range and I never know what has what until they are loaded and shot. I get a lot of practice doing reloads.

I think that there was only one time during the BBG course that I actually had to do a complete reload during a drill. Otherwise, I would run a drill and then do a "combat reload"  once I went to "safe" while leaving one in the pipe regardless if we only fired two or three shots during the drill. I would reload the magazine and return it to my magazine pouch when we got a break between drills. I was wearing one of my vests and the removed magazine was moved to the left vest pocket until I was ready to reload it.  It's just a habit with me.  If I am not wearing a vest, the removed magazine is stuffed into my waistband and the fresh mag pulled from a carrier.  I was running four magazines during the course but only rotated between two of them for the most part.
What most 21st Century Americans simply do not grasp is that the Constitution and Bill of Rights were not written to to give rights to the citizens of our then-new nation, but was instead written to tightly constrain the federal government.

M1911A1

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Re: Test Your Survival Shooting Skills
« Reply #12 on: December 17, 2015, 10:00:43 PM »
Yeah. Mike taught me to do that kind of partial-load magazine shift, too.
Mine go to a pants pocket on my left.

Whenever you can, give yourself a fully-loaded gun.
Steve,
retired leathersmith and practical shooter


"Qui desiderat pacem, pręparet bellum."