Author Topic: Cold Weather and Holsters  (Read 1232 times)

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Taurian

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Cold Weather and Holsters
« on: November 23, 2015, 09:19:01 AM »
In the late Spring, Summer, and early Autumn months I usually carry my EDC in an IWB holster.  As the colder weather sets in, I sometimes move to an OWB holster. My particular dress pattern in the warmer climates of the year consist of a T-shirt and outer shirt that is always unbuttoned.  As colder weather sets in, I usually add a vest of some sort, and when needed, an outer coat or jacket over that.  They are, of course, all unbuttoned or unzipped when I feel it necessary to do so. The extra layers of clothing allow me to move the carry to OWB without concern with "printing" or otherwise giving away that I am carrying concealed.  I normally shun sweatshirt or pullover wear, as it interferes with the draw stoke and takes two hands to perform (from my normal 3:00 o'clock or so position.  A vertical shoulder holster is another option; however, it is the least exercised of my carry options.

Recently, when running the BBG course with CR, I switched to the OWB holster rather than running my SHTF gear IWB holster.  While it was not cold, per se, the constant removing and holstering the Ruger SR1911CMD-A would be easier from the OWB holster than the IWB holster.

About a year or so ago I ran across an OWB holster, which I really liked, at a gun show.  It was of exceptional quality and very reasonably priced. It had a cross-hatch pattern, border stamping, and was fitted to a 1911 with a 5-inch barrel.  Of course, the Ruger SR1911CMD-A, with its 4.25-inch barrel length was housed perfectly in this holster, and performance-wise, I could not have asked for a better holster.  It was not only perfect for not only presenting the pistol from the holster but also worked perfectly when I needed to holster the pistol.  It is now on my side to house the Springfield 1911 Loaded.

[attach=1]

The maker of the holster was Walt Sippel, the owner of Leather Creek Holsters in Gainesville, Georgia.  He also makes holster for a plethora of pistols and revolvers.  It might be worth your while to check out some of his products - all of which are OWB holsters.  He also makes a fine leather of gun belts and holsters for single-action revolvers - one of which I will be ordering to accommodate the 8-inch barrels of my Uberti Remington conversion revolver reproductions.

I will be ordering a second holster for the 1911 in black and also an OWB  holster for the Springfield XDs (I carry the XDs 4.0 45 when I want to travel light.

Back to the topic at hand, do you transition from an IWB to an OWB holster for colder weather carry?
The fact that the GOVERNMENT would even consider removing the natural right to bear arms is the very reason why the 2nd Amendment was written.

oldranger53

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Re: Cold Weather and Holsters
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2015, 09:24:11 PM »
In the late Spring, Summer, and early Autumn months I usually carry my EDC in an IWB holster.  As the colder weather sets in, I sometimes move to an OWB holster. My particular dress pattern in the warmer climates of the year consist of a T-shirt and outer shirt that is always unbuttoned.  As colder weather sets in, I usually add a vest of some sort, and when needed, an outer coat or jacket over that.  They are, of course, all unbuttoned or unzipped when I feel it necessary to do so. The extra layers of clothing allow me to move the carry to OWB without concern with "printing" or otherwise giving away that I am carrying concealed.  I normally shun sweatshirt or pullover wear, as it interferes with the draw stoke and takes two hands to perform (from my normal 3:00 o'clock or so position.  A vertical shoulder holster is another option; however, it is the least exercised of my carry options.

Recently, when running the BBG course with CR, I switched to the OWB holster rather than running my SHTF gear IWB holster.  While it was not cold, per se, the constant removing and holstering the Ruger SR1911CMD-A would be easier from the OWB holster than the IWB holster.

About a year or so ago I ran across an OWB holster, which I really liked, at a gun show.  It was of exceptional quality and very reasonably priced. It had a cross-hatch pattern, border stamping, and was fitted to a 1911 with a 5-inch barrel.  Of course, the Ruger SR1911CMD-A, with its 4.25-inch barrel length was housed perfectly in this holster, and performance-wise, I could not have asked for a better holster.  It was not only perfect for not only presenting the pistol from the holster but also worked perfectly when I needed to holster the pistol.  It is now on my side to house the Springfield 1911 Loaded.

[attach=1]

The maker of the holster was Walt Sippel, the owner of Leather Creek Holsters in Gainesville, Georgia.  He also makes holster for a plethora of pistols and revolvers.  It might be worth your while to check out some of his products - all of which are OWB holsters.  He also makes a fine leather of gun belts and holsters for single-action revolvers - one of which I will be ordering to accommodate the 8-inch barrels of my Uberti Remington conversion revolver reproductions.

I will be ordering a second holster for the 1911 in black and also an OWB  holster for the Springfield XDs (I carry the XDs 4.0 45 when I want to travel light.

Back to the topic at hand, do you transition from an IWB to an OWB holster for colder weather carry?
Hi,
I have, in times past, almost exclusively carried OWB whenever I could wear suitable outer garments like sports coats, winter jackets, etc...
As the years go by I find myself being more concerned with utility functions regardless of the weather.

I know that doesn't say much, but that's about the size of it.

I have two OWB holsters that I really like, but they both hold such a high profile that I just don't use em much.
One is a Blackhawk Serpa.  It's awesome and I love it, but to keep it concealed properly I'd have to wear a down parka constantly.  No can do.

The other is one I got from Beretta, and it's a retention paddle holster.  It holds lower profile but the paddle is too small compared to the weight it is supposed to carry, and doesn't feel secure enough to suit me.

Sigh.

Some day I'll try some more combinations of belts, holsters, and magazine carriers.  For now, eh, whatever floats my boat on a given day is what happens.

<Sent from phone. Typos possible.>

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Taurian

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Re: Cold Weather and Holsters
« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2015, 06:07:24 AM »
I like the "Pancake" style of holster, as they provide the lowest profile. I have fairly long arms and I find most holsters ride too high. Pancake holsters are fine for carrying because that places the butt of the gun high and tight against the body.  Drawing the gun; however, could be difficult depending on the ride height of the holster.  I prefer that a holster places the handle of the gun as close to the belt line as possible to make drawing the gun easier. I need just enough space to get a full grip on the handgun before drawing it.

I detest paddle holsters.  While I have not had bad experiences with them (because I don't wear them), I know people who have pulled the entire holster out with the gun.

We have a local gun show this weekend and Walt is usually at that one with his wares.  Hopefully, he'll have a holster that works for me.

Of course, how large a handgun that is being carried makes a difference in deciding how to carry it.
The fact that the GOVERNMENT would even consider removing the natural right to bear arms is the very reason why the 2nd Amendment was written.