Author Topic: Guns for Beginners: Three Tips for Open Carry  (Read 2670 times)

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Robert Harvey

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Guns for Beginners: Three Tips for Open Carry
« on: March 28, 2015, 08:14:13 PM »
This is a good article and can be applied with concealed carry as well.
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1. Maintain situational awareness
2. Keep your distance!
3. Look good, be polite
http://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/2015/03/robert-farago/guns-for-beginners-three-tips-for-open-carry/
Full article posted with permission.


 Guns for Beginners: Three Tips for Open Carry   By Robert Farago  on March 27, 2015                       HipHolster01-263x300 height=300
When I blogged the heinous murder of a Philadelphia dog walker in a “safe” neighborhood, two things struck me. First, that the killers admitted to searching for an easy target. Second, the murderous villains would not have considered a dog walker openly carrying a firearm an easy target. Yes, there is that. I’m a firm proponent of open carry for comfort, firearms normalization (which defends and extends gun rights) and deterrence. But there’s an important if statistically improbable concern: firearm retention. You don’t want someone using your gun against you. If you’re new to guns and want to open carry, excellent! Here are three tips for dealing with that issue . . .

1. Maintain situational awareness
Situational awareness means being aware of your situation. Thinking about where you are, who’s around you, what’s happening and what might happen. In other words, proactively scan your environment for your safety. Are you in a situation where there’s a possibility of a gun grab? Is the possibility high, low or extremely unlikely?
The general rule of thumb for open carry is the same general rule of thumb for concealed carry: avoid stupid people in stupid places doing stupid things. If you find yourself somewhere where two of these three criteria are operative – say a bar with people getting drunk –  leave. If all three are present, you shouldn’t be. Vamoose. Bail. Skidaddle. Hit the road. Better yet, don’t go there.
Situational awareness requires more than a simple heads-up. It’s also about being aware of your own ability to avoid, escape or engage. As in defend yourself. Where’s cover (something that will block bullets) and/or concealment (a place to hide)? How would you help friends of family? It’s not paranoia. It’s simple, basic, preparedness.
The greater the potential risk of a gun grab, the more you need to be ready for evasive action or violent confrontation. For example, if you have to pump gas late at night, be prepared to run, use the car as a block or defend yourself. Consider your defensive options and then get on with the business at hand: enjoying life as free American.
If that process seems too daunting, you might not want to open carry. Keep in mind that the process becomes instinctive and that most of us live in a world where the risk of a violent attack are low. Generally speaking, criminals aren’t looking for a fight, never mind a gunfight. Open carry reduces your risk of an assault.
2. Keep your distance!
If your spidey senses start tingling, if a dodgy looking stranger or group of strangers is vectoring towards you, move! Distance = survival. If you need to deal with an attack, the more distance you put between you and your aggressor(s) the more defensive options you have – including non-firearm-related action (e.g., shouting a warning and /or the blocking strategy described above).
I don’t mean run away any time a stranger or strangers approach. Check out who’s coming into your personal space and decide whether or not evasive action is required. For example, if [what appears to be] a pan-handler is moving towards me, if someone untoward asks me the time, I move away. If I’m walking down the street at night and I see a gang of twenty-something men heading my way, I cross the street. If I’m strolling down an average street on an average day, I’m aware but not evasive.
When you get near a stranger, position your body to reduce the risk of a gun grab and increase your ability to protect your firearm (some basic close-quarters combat training wouldn’t go amiss). When I open carry and meet new people, I stand slightly sideways, with my left shoulder (I carry on the right side) towards the stranger. Again, this isn’t pathological. If everything seems fine, I relax and continue enjoying life as free American.
3. Look good, be polite
The other “threat” that worries new open carriers: the police and bystanders.
Don’t let the dozens of open carrier/cop confrontations on YouTube put you off. If a police officer approaches you, keep your hands in plain sight (away from your gun), smile, be polite (of course) and deal. Legally, you don’t have to show ID or ID yourself to a police officer unless he or she suspects you of a crime. But you’re under no obligation to school the cops, which almost always leads to delay and an escalation of their investigation.
If you’re going to comply – which you can do while stating your objection – ask the officer how they’d like you to proceed. “My wallet is in my back pocket. Is it OK if I take it out?” Speak and move slowly. Relax. If they want to check your gun and you’re OK with that, have them remove your firearm. If you’re wearing a retention holster, tell them and ask how they want to proceed.
As for interested bystanders, be polite (of course) but never let anyone touch your gun. Don’t remove your firearm from the holster to show it to someone. As for antagonistic bystanders, people who object to open carry, be polite (of course) and leave as soon as possible. There’s no point in engaging in a gun rights debate with someone who doesn’t know a free American when he or she sees one. You’ll only stress yourself out and increase the chances of a physical attack.
Above all, look good. Dress well, do normal stuff. Wearing an aggressively pro-2A T-shirt or bandolier of bullets (I’ve seen it) is asking for trouble. Don’t get me wrong: as a free American you’re free to dress any way you please and behave in any way that’s legal. But you’ll do more for your own protection, and the protection of your and our gun rights, by presenting yourself as a clean-cut “average Joe.”
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some comments from the blog.
March 27, 2015 at 11:50 Curtis and Steve:  I appreciate the deterrence argument and I have to agree with you that your average criminal is going to pick an easier target.  My thinking is that your average criminal is going to be deterred by the fact that I am a 6′ tall 225 lbs guy.  It’s the one that isn’t deterred that I am worried about.
Danny:  You are absolutely right.  If you have good reasons to OC, then you should OC.  However to address your second statement…
“…why would you want to surprise your attacker?”
Because that element of surprise gives me back a tiny bit of the edge I lost in being attacked (which is a failure of my awareness to begin with).  If someone knows I am armed, and still decides to attack me, then they will come at me prepared to deal with that threat.  If they don’t know I am armed, then I have a nasty surprise for them.
Once again, this is all conjecture and training on my part.  I have never been attacked and I have never had to use my weapon outside of the range (God willing and the creek don’t rise, I never will have to). Since data is hard to come by on deterrence vs surprise I have to trust my gut.
Of course OC or CC, either way is better than no carry.
   
  avatar height=40 says: March 27, 2015 at 13:16 “Because that element of surprise gives me back a tiny bit of the edge I lost in being attacked”
Which is not better than not being attacked at all in the first place.
As for the rest…the “sees me armed and attacks me anyway,” check out William Aprill’s excellent lectures on victim selection.
Here’s a primer to get started:
http://dsbscience.com/ballisticradio/BR20130714_WilliamAprillDeselectYourself.php
The key point to understand and internalize is that the default is “don’t attack.”  They, violent criminals, have to very quickly see evidence to undo that default…evidence that an attack has a high likelihood of success.
There HAS been at least one documented case (Waffle House in Georgia) where criminals admitted after getting caught that they declined robbing a place because they saw customers with OC handguns inside before they entered.
In other words…the “deterrence” effect has both a huge body of research (by those that study criminals and criminal motivations) and real-world documentation to support it; the ‘shoot me first’ or ‘attack me anyway’ does not.
 
« Last Edit: March 29, 2015, 03:40:47 PM by Robert Harvey »
Time will tell.

crzyjarmans

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Re: Guns for Beginners: Three Tips for Open Carry
« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2015, 04:16:22 AM »
OC in my opinion on a regular bases, is not a good idea, I have friends that carry and sometimes OC, being a big guy, and also carrying, may deter someone from attacking, but not if that BG also has a firearm, I'm 6' 220 Lbs, I don't see myself as someone that a BG won't attack just because of my size and he sees I'm armed, this would suggest to me that I'll be someone he'll won't out of the game (so to speak) quickly, BG usually prey on the weak, the ones they feel are not a threat to them, I'd rather come off like this, I would rather the BG not see me as a threat, just might be more in my favor of stopping a deadly encounter, JMO
Shawn, Stay armed, Stay safe

Robert Harvey

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Re: Guns for Beginners: Three Tips for Open Carry
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2015, 06:56:35 AM »
OC in my opinion on a regular bases, is not a good idea, I have friends that carry and sometimes OC, being a big guy, and also carrying, may deter someone from attacking, but not if that BG also has a firearm, I'm 6' 220 Lbs, I don't see myself as someone that a BG won't attack just because of my size and he sees I'm armed, this would suggest to me that I'll be someone he'll won't out of the game (so to speak) quickly, BG usually prey on the weak, the ones they feel are not a threat to them, I'd rather come off like this, I would rather the BG not see me as a threat, just might be more in my favor of stopping a deadly encounter, JMO
the way I understand it there are to groups of crooks.
1. the average crook - he wants the path of least resistance. If you are carrying, (and not telegraphing that you don't know what your doing.) and they see that you are  Open Carrying, they will look for a easier target.

2. the aggressive professional crook.   - this is the one you will have issues with no matter how you carry. this crook is well practiced, an expert and very familiar with a gun.
Your gun will not cause this crook to look else where.
This is the person you want to avoid if at all possible.

Open carry is an option as well as Concealed carry.
It is not for everyone.
(and there are some idiots that open carry, and give everyone else a bad name.
Do not emulate them. Emulate the ones that open carry, the same way you conceal carry. as if it is not even there. Your not there to fight the police or the owners, etc. You are there to do business as normal. Hopefully kindly and politely teaching about carrying guns for protection.)
« Last Edit: March 29, 2015, 03:38:45 PM by Robert Harvey »
Time will tell.

crzyjarmans

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Re: Guns for Beginners: Three Tips for Open Carry
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2015, 04:40:24 AM »
I don't have any problem with open carry, I see from time to time, someone OC, in fact a few of my biker buddies OC while we ride, ever sense I've been riding with this guys, we have not had a issue, no one ran off screaming "HE'S GOT A GUN", there is a group of people around here from time to time, they go around doing clean ups at parks, side of streets open carrying to show not all people are violent criminals, I would gladly join in on something like that, education is the key
Shawn, Stay armed, Stay safe

flyover

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Re: Guns for Beginners: Three Tips for Open Carry
« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2015, 01:05:13 PM »

3. Look good, be polite


In one of Mas Ayoob's books, he speaks about having your clothes and gun articles complement each other, ie. , dark clothes, dark gun, dark holster and belt. In other words, dark clothing will help camouflage a dark gun and a dark gun belt.

Believe me, he said it better than I can.

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Re: Guns for Beginners: Three Tips for Open Carry
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2015, 05:21:57 AM »
I have no desire to open carry around here. I have seen a few doing it, but it's just not for me.

flyover

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Re: Guns for Beginners: Three Tips for Open Carry
« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2015, 08:52:27 AM »
I have no desire to open carry around here. I have seen a few doing it, but it's just not for me.

The only time I open carry is here on the farm while doing outside chores. Nobody around but me and the snakes, coyotes and other critters.

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Re: Guns for Beginners: Three Tips for Open Carry
« Reply #7 on: April 04, 2015, 12:08:27 PM »
I rarely carry OC. An exception is if I am primitive camping with no logistical support other than my sidearm and shotgun. In which case, I am usually wearing a vest of some sort as a protective covering (for myself and the firearm). Normally, I would have the Ruger GP141 or Redhawk in a cross-draw holster when camping or an occasional walk in the woods while camping.

I have, on occasion, carried the 20-gauge with me in its carrier along with a hunter's 'butt pack' that carries some essentials for the hike and have not received any comments from other hikers that I may pass while hiking. In fact, I overheard one 'woods stroller' comment to his wife that he needed a rig like the one I have.

If I happen to be camping in a public campground, my sidearm is concealed IWB; no need to concern the natives with my habits.  They may; however, see the sheath for my knife (which is an acceptable and common tool for campers to have on their belt).

Even though (licensed) concealed carry is allowed at the Stone Mountain Campground (which is now privatized),  my 'camping buddy' is well hidden. I don't stroll around with any firearm showing.

I feel no need to advertise my bona fides in public and would rather steer people's intentions elsewhere.
What most 21st Century Americans simply do not grasp is that the Constitution and Bill of Rights were not written to to give rights to the citizens of our then-new nation, but was instead written to tightly constrain the federal government.

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Re: Guns for Beginners: Three Tips for Open Carry
« Reply #8 on: August 20, 2016, 09:48:20 PM »
Once in a while I see guys, and girls, carrying openly.  Most times it's in Butte, but I've seen em out in the sparse areas as well.  Never have I seen anyone hassle them.  Of course, that doesn't mean they don't get hassled, just that I haven't seen it happen.
Still, I'll not go down that road unless there's a very good reason TO do it.  I just don't like all that attention.

If I just have to have attention, I'll sing a special in church on Sunday mornings...or go back to doing Sunday evenings at the nursing home, singing that is. 
Never shall I fail my comrades. I will always keep myself mentally alert, physically strong and morally straight, and I will shoulder more than my share of the task whatever it may be.  One hundred percent and then some.