Author Topic: Alpha drills  (Read 710 times)

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CR Williams

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Alpha drills
« on: March 26, 2014, 06:29:31 AM »
I am naming this set in honor of the FSB Alpha drills that Larry Vickers put on video that appeared to discomfit so very many people.

There are two components to this set: Fire control and working through distractions. This aspects can be worked separately or combined. For these drills, you need at least one other person with you. It is preferable to have at least two so that one can act as the safety. You also need at least some waffle balls (or whatever the light plastic ones with the holes are called) or something as light, and racquet or soft rubber balls would be useful as well.

Fire control:

Basic: One target, distance up to you. Shooter will begin slow-fire sequence (shoot a one-hole drill, basically). At random intervals, partner will toss a waffle ball from behind the shooter such that shooter is going to see it in his peripheral vision or crossing in front. As soon as shooter perceives the waffle ball in the air, they must stop firing. Simple as that. See movement, stop shooting.

Variations: Multiple targets--As soon as shooter sees ball, shift away from the area/direction it's in to engage another target. Continued engagement--shooter stops until ball hits ground, then resumes engagement of target(s). Target discrimination--balls of a designated color will be engaged by the shooter while they are in the air [SAFETY NOTE: Vertical engagement window must be determined and adhered to in order to keep rounds in the berm and to avoid skipping anything off the ground. If you don't think you can manage your fire to stay within that window, DON'T TRY IT.). Other colors are treated as normal for this drill.

Distraction:

SAFETY NOTE: IF THE PARTNER CANNOT ADHERE TO THE LIMITATIONS SET ON THEM IN THE FOLLOWING DESCRIPTION, FORGET EVEN TRYING THIS. THIS IS NOT A DRILL THAT ALLOWS FOR ANYBODY TO GET CUTE AND GO OUTSIDE THE RESTRICTIONS SET. BE SURE THE PARTNER UNDERSTANDS HOW AND HOW FAR THEY SHOULD PROCEED WITH THIS PART OR DON'T DO IT. Got that? Fine:

Basic One: Shooter stands ready, gun on target. Partner will push randomly on shooter's body for a time. LIMITATIONS: Pusher must use broad surfaces for push, not poke with fingers. Push only hard enough to shift part of the body an inch or two at most (in some places there will be no movement, just the perception of pressure). NO PUNCHING, NO POKING, NO TICKLING. DO NOT PUSH ARM(S) OR HANDS OF SHOOTER.

If I were pushing, I would use either palm or back of hand or form a fist, place it into contact where I was pushing, and apply pressure to that area. In contact, gentle push, move, repeat. At most, I seek to move the upper torso maybe an inch or rotate around the spine just that much. Lower body, at most move the leg an inch. At no point do you want to risk collapsing the knee and bringing the shooter down suddenly. Get it?

Push for a time, then on command partner stops and shooter engages target.

Basic Two: Partner will apply pressure as shooter engages target.

Variation: Stand a few feet behind shooter with racquet balls or waffle balls, gently lob balls into shooters back at random intervals as they engage.

Advanced One: Gun in holster, shooter faces partner with target(s) to side or back. Partner will engage shooter with empty-hand movements at no more than half-speed and light pressure (no full-on strikes). Shooter will defend and deflect these strikes. After a time and on signal, shooter will turn, draw, and engage the targets as partner steps back away from the firing line.

Advanced Two-One: Partner steps behind shooter and applies intermittent pressure as in Basic One.

Advanced Two-Two: Increase speed and intensity of strikes previous to engagement.

The two drills can be combined. Distraction and fire-control. Shooter shoots under intermittent pressure and has to stop when the ball comes over.

Safety observer is strongly advised when performing distraction drills.

Got all that? Guys, this is not something that someone fresh out of CCW qualification or basic shooting class is up for. Got that? You need some time on the gun, some experience, some more training before you step up to this one. Okay? You're the one that pays the price if you push your limits too far. You're the one who is responsible for your safety. Don't do this unless you fully understand what to do, how to do it, and are willing to assume any and all responsibility for something going wrong because you or somebody else wanted to be just like the Alpha guys. Okay?

That said, enjoy.
Shikan haramitsu dai ko myo.

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