Author Topic: Video of Transition Drill  (Read 2082 times)

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CR Williams

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Video of Transition Drill
« on: October 26, 2013, 02:04:25 PM »
This is a video demonstration of the transition drill posted previously. Due to Photobucket restraints, it had to be split into two parts.

http://s52.photobucket.com/user/crw0000/media/TransitionPart1_zpsb28ceff9.mp4.html

http://s52.photobucket.com/user/crw0000/media/TransitionPart2_zps25cc9951.mp4.html

Note the opportunities in this for 'incidental' training. With proper focus, I can train three or more separate techniques at once during this one drill.

As I say in the video, if you have questions, ask.
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Robert Harvey

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Re: Video of Transition Drill
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2013, 02:43:18 PM »
Thank you.
I still need to get a rifle.
I have my carry and a shot gun.
:)
Time will tell.

M1911A1

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Re: Video of Transition Drill
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2013, 03:12:37 PM »
Due to old equipment and a slow ISP line, I cannot access the videos. Thus, my comment may have already been covered in Richard's presentation.

Back when I was an active "practical shooter," we devised several useful ways of transitioning from rifle to pistol, and vice-versa.

One probably should only transition from rifle to pistol when the rifle has been shot dry and there is not enough time to do a proper reload. Using the pistol can give you time and space, particularly if you first shoot, then move.
Transitioning from pistol to rifle usually implies sufficient time and space to "get lower, and get steadier." Nevertheless, moving immediately to some sort of low cover is an important part of the process. Further, moving laterally after each shot, while maintaining cover, is also very important. (Don't always move in the exact same direction, of course.)

When one transitions from rifle to pistol, control must be maintained over the rifle. One does not want to leave it for pick-up by one's enemies.
One method is to drop to the strong-side knee, simultaneously with drawing the pistol. The rifle stays in the weak-side hand, its butt drops to the ground, and the empty rifle thus becomes a supporting monopod for the pistol.
This can help you make very accurate pistol shots, even under severe pressure.

The next move, of course, is to roll down into cover and reload the rifle.
Steve,
retired leathersmith and practical shooter


"Qui desiderat pacem, pręparet bellum."

CR Williams

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Re: Video of Transition Drill
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2013, 05:03:38 PM »
Put a sling on the shotgun, Robert. Drills will work the same way with any long gun, pretty much.

Steve, the transition is to drop the rifle behind the back on sling. I've seen transitions where the rifle is held with the non-pistol hand but I don't like them as much. Whether you transition or either reload or fix the rifle is dependent on whether you can get to cover quickly, the distance you're engaging at, and the immediate need to continue firing or not.
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Taurian

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Re: Video of Transition Drill
« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2013, 10:13:55 AM »
Quote
When one transitions from rifle to pistol, control must be maintained over the rifle. One does not want to leave it for pick-up by one's enemies.

One method is to drop to the strong-side knee, simultaneously with drawing the pistol. The rifle stays in the weak-side hand, its butt drops to the ground, and the empty rifle thus becomes a supporting monopod for the pistol.

This can help you make very accurate pistol shots, even under severe pressure.

This comes natural to those being left-handed long-gun shooters but right-handed pistol shooters by nature or by choice (by choice with me). The use of the long-gun as a monopod, in this instance of transitioning from long gun to hand gun, is a good recommendation. I also go along with the use of a sling on long guns. If a magazine change is called for, the sling allows the quick positioning of the long gun for shoulder carry to free up the weak hand for the magazine change either while stationary or on the move. Or, the long gun can be positioned so that it is secure between the shooter's left leg and body while resting on the right knee.

Some lefty long gun shooters complain about right-hand designed long guns. I happen to find them an advantage (in my case); I reload right handed while the firearm is held in my left hand. The long gun remains in the left hand as I transition to handgun (cross-draw or strong side draw). My only consternation is being a left-handed long-gun shooter while being right-eye dominant; it really screws with me at times.

I have tried the single-point slings, but I am not comfortable with them yet.
What most 21st Century Americans simply do not grasp is that the Constitution and Bill of Rights were not written to to give rights to the citizens of our then-new nation, but was instead written to tightly constrain the federal government.

CR Williams

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Re: Video of Transition Drill
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2013, 06:01:47 PM »
Two reasons to avoid single-point slings:

If you're not careful, you could butt-stroke yourself taking a knee or squatting quickly.

If they're in reach, the attacker gets a handy attachment to use to throw you around with. (Gabe Suarez saw this happen to one of his entry team members once. Bad guy got ahold of the MP5 on the single-point and threw the guy all over the room for a little while.)

Robert: I'm thinking a sling on your shotgun could be very handy because--assuming a home defense situation, you're talking short range. Shotgun's going to run dry faster than a rifle. The range in the house is well inside where you transition to pistol instead of trying to fix or reload the long gun. Thus, potentially a very handy thing to be able to do.
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Robert Harvey

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Re: Video of Transition Drill
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2013, 09:59:47 AM »
Two reasons to avoid single-point slings:

If you're not careful, you could butt-stroke yourself taking a knee or squatting quickly.

If they're in reach, the attacker gets a handy attachment to use to throw you around with. (Gabe Suarez saw this happen to one of his entry team members once. Bad guy got ahold of the MP5 on the single-point and threw the guy all over the room for a little while.)

Robert: I'm thinking a sling on your shotgun could be very handy because--assuming a home defense situation, you're talking short range. Shotgun's going to run dry faster than a rifle. The range in the house is well inside where you transition to pistol instead of trying to fix or reload the long gun. Thus, potentially a very handy thing to be able to do.
I will try it out.
In alabama to hunt deer with a shot gun you have to limit the # of shells to 3.
Is there an easy way I can do this for deer season then remove the limitation once deer season is over. or should I buy a second shot gun?
Time will tell.

CR Williams

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Re: Video of Transition Drill
« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2013, 10:53:07 AM »
Magazine plugs. Are they legal in AL? (I don't hunt so I'm not up on it.) Put them in for hunting, pull them out for other stuff.
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Taurian

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Re: Video of Transition Drill
« Reply #8 on: October 28, 2013, 03:42:48 PM »
Magazine plugs. Are they legal in AL? (I don't hunt so I'm not up on it.) Put them in for hunting, pull them out for other stuff.

That would be the answer. Also, I would check to see if that is three rounds in the tube (that provides 4, if one is chambered) or three rounds total, which would only mean two in the tube and one chambered. This is important; if the gun can hold more that the designated rounds, your friendly game warden will not be pleased, your shotgun goes away, and so do you.

Most hunting shotguns come with a plastic spacer already installed in the tube when purchased new. You can also buy them. A simply wooden dowel cut to length works just fine. Unload shotgun, remove the barrel, remove the tube cap, insert dowel, install tube cap, install barrel.

You might want to check with DNR on "total" capacity for a hunting shotgun. Most fowling pieces (including Turkey gun) are limited to three.

Another option is to foot for a double-barrel for hunting and keep your security shotgun for just that.
What most 21st Century Americans simply do not grasp is that the Constitution and Bill of Rights were not written to to give rights to the citizens of our then-new nation, but was instead written to tightly constrain the federal government.