Author Topic: Getting the drawstroke straight  (Read 1432 times)

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CR Williams

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Getting the drawstroke straight
« on: October 25, 2013, 12:06:28 PM »
I am inclined to roll this one out early. There may be some extra input over the next few weeks. I am leaning that direction. Either way:

When drawing the weapon from the holster, you want to keep the arm moving in a line and close to the body. You don't want your arm going to the side--chicken-winging, it's call--if you can help it. (Exception is drawing when sitting on a couch or a car seat, something like that.) This will help you get your arm moving the way you want.

Simply stand so that your weapon arm is all but brushing or lightly in contact with a wall. Now, execute the drawstroke. You will know if your arm is drifting to the outside. Draw and present parallel to the wall.

Do this at first until you get it straight and then every so often afterwards to reinforce the notion.
« Last Edit: October 27, 2013, 08:44:55 AM by CR Williams »
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pop pop

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Re: Getting the drawstroke straight
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2013, 05:15:27 AM »
My draw stroke worries me. My hammer spur is still on my roscoe and I pocket carry. When I practice I always put my thumb over the hammer and create a slide so the hammer will not snag my pocket as it exits. I hope I have slid the thumb over the hammer enough so it has become intreanched in my mind enough. I do not want to cut the hammer tang because it may cause light hits on the primer, because of lighter weight of the hammer. Like I said I am concerned.

Never occured to me about chicken winging it. Plan to see.

Taurian

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Re: Getting the drawstroke straight
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2013, 12:09:06 PM »
Good post, C.R. I agree. The elbow should be as to the rear (and not to the side) as possible. It puts the hand in a more comfortable (and correct) position the remove the gun.

As a note; if the elbow flares sideways, the shoulder will roll forward. If the elbow is forced back, the shoulder will also move back. According to some, with the perfect draw the shoulder should not move at all.
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1911 guy

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Re: Getting the drawstroke straight
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2013, 06:24:47 AM »
Agreed.  Keeping the elbow tucked in keeps the pistol moving in a line to the target, not wandering off into space following the bend in the elbow.  Most people won't notice it on their own, but when compared to a stroke that is straight, it is far more efficient.
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M1911A1

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Re: Getting the drawstroke straight
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2013, 03:06:29 PM »
...According to some, with the perfect draw the shoulder should not move at all.  [emphasis added]

Dunno if it's age or arthritis, but when I present from about 4:00, my shoulder has to lift during the beginning of my presentation.
Try it, and see whether your shoulder lifts upwards too. I bet that it does.


When shooting in IPSC competition, years and years ago, my Snick holster was at about 1:30. In that case, there was neither shoulder lift nor elbow-outward movement. Presentation was both straight-line and very quick.
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Taurian

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Re: Getting the drawstroke straight
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2013, 03:11:33 PM »
...According to some, with the perfect draw the shoulder should not move at all.  [emphasis added]

Dunno if it's age or arthritis, but when I present from about 4:00, my shoulder has to lift during the beginning of my presentation.
Try it, and see whether your shoulder lifts upwards too. I bet that it does.


When shooting in IPSC competition, years and years ago, my Snick holster was at about 1:30. In that case, there was neither shoulder lift nor elbow-outward movement. Presentation was both straight-line and very quick.

It does raise - and rolls forward depending on where the holster is positioned (around 1530 hours for me). A broken right collarbone doesn't help the draw-stroke at all. But, it's something that you come to live with.
What most 21st Century Americans simply do not grasp is that the Constitution and Bill of Rights were not written to to give rights to the citizens of our then-new nation, but was instead written to tightly constrain the federal government.

CR Williams

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Re: Getting the drawstroke straight
« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2013, 05:34:22 AM »
There are some shoulder conditions that make it uncomfortable to carry 3:00-5:00. Either crossdraw or appendix-position carry should be investigated if you have difficulty with the 3-5 position.
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