Author Topic: Follow-Through  (Read 1221 times)

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CR Williams

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Follow-Through
« on: December 01, 2011, 11:06:09 AM »
Do it. After each good shot, after each good burst, hold the position, hold the posture, hold the sight picture. There are two reasons.

Roger Phillips says this a lot: "Looks a certain way, feels a certain way." If you let it, the body remembers, the mind remembers the set you had of a successful shot and will be more likely to re-acquire it next time if you give it time to 'set'. Follow-through is what does that. Correspondingly, if the shot is bad, drop the posture quickly so that it is less likely to set up in the subconscious. Thus, proper and consistent follow-through is a part of the learning process.

Lack of follow-through can be the source of a bad shot, to wit: It seems like it's instant, but there is a measurable time between the break of the trigger and the point where the bullet leaves the barrel. Among other things that have to go on are the mechanical actions of the trigger or striker mechanisms, the ignition of the powder and the buildup to pressure sufficient to drive the bullet out, and the travel time down the barrel. If you have not consciously and consistently built up the habit of the follow-through, the relaxation (for want of a better word) that begins once the shot is triggered can alter the path of the shot in just the time it takes to get the bullet out the barrel. This will be more of a factor at longer ranges than at short, but is a factor nonetheless.

Consistent follow-through is thus an important component of both training and actual shooting. Make it a habit.
« Last Edit: December 01, 2011, 12:46:16 PM by CR Williams »
Shikan haramitsu dai ko myo.

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pop pop

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Re: Follow-Through
« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2011, 12:48:37 PM »
Agreed CR. I always try to follow through but one thing that has really helped me is to do my practice very methodically, and also at a hurry up slow pace. I quit trying to fire rapid fire for practice, other than just a few rounds to savor the feel of fast shooting. I have found that slow and smoothe practice is fast, when you need to be fast.

Consentrating on good deliberate mechanics, and also including follow through, whether with presentation, dry fire, or live fire, works for me. It has improved my shooting and brought my ability too a higher level. I once had no worries with shooting, but age has crept up on me and what came easy and natural is much harder now. Not making excuses here, but stating facts of life. Getting older is not for sissies!!!!!!!

FlashBack

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Re: Follow-Through
« Reply #2 on: December 07, 2011, 08:39:25 AM »
Nice thread going here...points to take to heart!
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CR Williams

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Re: Follow-Through
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2012, 03:21:43 PM »
Shikan haramitsu dai ko myo.

In Shadow In Light - Studying and advancing the art and the science of the fight.

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SARGeek

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Re: Follow-Through
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2012, 11:37:09 AM »
Like how you separated into the "Shooter's follow through", so needed for accuracy, and the "Fight follow through" so needed to keep you alive. It is action of both the body and the mind in both cases and your presentation did a lot to get that across.

Nice work!
SARGeek