Author Topic: First aid kit / medical bag what do you have *this topic is NOT medical advice!  (Read 7178 times)

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Robert Harvey

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Please tell us about your med kit, first aid kit, medical bag.
What do you have in it.
tell us of your ideas that might help others.
This is topic is not to be considered medical advice.
Even if we are giving advice in this topic, it is up to you to have due diligence to find out what is right and best for you.
You are responsible for what you do with the information you find here. Not the person that post it.

Thanks
Robert
« Last Edit: November 26, 2011, 02:34:43 PM by Coastie »
Time will tell.

Robert Harvey

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First aid kit / medical bag what do you have in yours, list out things and ideas.
Some of us may not have some items or thought of the ideas you have for yours.
 Help us make a more complete kit.
 I have a cheap tool box from Wal-Mart.
 We added stuff, as it was needed for something or another:
Aspirin, Tylenol, Ibuprofen, Benadryl liquid (to be taken by mouth), Benadryl cream (external use only), gauze, cotton balls, medical tape, sports tape, eye wash kit, papaya tablets (for stomach problems), gly-oxide (for mouth sores) rubbing Alcohol, Otto scope, hydrocortisone cream, silvadene (get your doctor to give you a prescription for a small container, for burns, works good on sun burns also (caution sulfa drug- do not use if you have allergies to sulfur drugs.), dermoplast spray, dibucaine ointment, carmex, tooth ache stuff, asthma stuff , swim ear, several knives and scissors, tweezers,  Neosporin, iodine tincture, calamine lotion, probiotic Acidophilus, plastic flossers, extra tooth brushes, visine, hydrogen peroxide solution, Arnicare gel (muscle aches, bruising), Band-Aids, elastic wraps,  for reference SAS survival guide, and red cross standard first Aid.
We have several wilderness books we plan to get, saving up for them.
Things are sorted in to Ziploc bags, thing that might leak are in their own bag.
thanks
Robert
 
 
« Last Edit: November 26, 2011, 12:34:01 PM by Robert Harvey »
Time will tell.

Coastie

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As an EMT I picked up a EMS Medical Bag from www.galls.com (one of the Internet suppliers we usually order from).  Anyone can order from Galls, and their prices are reasonable.  We have this bag in a hall closet and if we need to bug out; visit a neighbor (who needs medical assistance) or  whatever (as well as going on a road trip), we take this bag. 


http://www.galls.com/style-TK080-general_catalog-dyna-med-compact-medic-level-2-first-responder-kit



Compact Medic Bag
Nylon construction
8"H x 14"W x 3-1/2"D; 392 cubic inches

Fits in places a bulkier bag might not
Space-saving briefcase style
12 interior pockets
Loops of varying sizes
Large interior pocket perfect for BP kits

Contents:
Airway1   
CPR Mask
Dressings & Bandages16 Bandages (1" x 3")
1 Abdominal Pad (5" x 9")
10 Gauze Pads (4" x 4")
1 Blood Stopper
1 Gauze Roll (3")
1 Gauze Roll (4")
10 Alcohol Wipes
1 Antimicrobial Wipes
1 Waterproof Tape (1")
1 Waterproof Tape (1/2")
1 Elastic Bandage (3")
2 Triangular Bandages

4 Eye Pads
10 Antibiotic Ointment
Burn
1   Burn Pad
Equipment & Supplies
1   SAM Splint (4-1/4" x 9")
2   Small Cold Packs
1   Instrument Pack (shears,bandage scissors, penlight,seatbelt cutter, window punch)
1   Space Blanket
2 Pairs Latex Gloves
1 Eye Wash (4 oz)
1 First Aid Book
1 Garrity® Disposable Flashlight


(and then as needed we restock, usually from Galls - since we're not with the Fire District any longer... it just an expense we make to insure neighbors are watched out for.)
« Last Edit: November 26, 2011, 12:34:13 PM by Robert Harvey »

Charles1951

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IMHO one of the best ways to know what should be in your first aid/medical kit is to get some training. Red Cross first aid training is one that is offered just about everywhere. If you put something in your kit is good to know how to use it.

My first training was in the Boy Scouts. There we learned to use triangular bandages in many ways but that is something that you can't find in many stores. It easy to make them from old bed sheets. Just remember if you do that, it is not a sterile dressing. To make them start with a square piece about 40" by 40" and fold it to make a triangle and cut along the fold. I like to have three in any serious kit.

The two lists you guys provided are pretty good for most practical uses (again in my opinion because I'm not a doc.) The only thing that I saw missing from the lists was a petroleum gauze pad for use on a sucking chest wound. That item is something I remember from training from 20 years ago so it may not even be a current first aid procedure. Lacking that item, there are ways to improvise. I don't have one myself at this time.

Robert, for all the meds you have in your list. They should only be used for non-trauma first aid (comfort assistance.) For instance, don't give meds to a victim of a gun shot wound. Common sense? Maybe. (I need current training. Time to find a Red Cross course.)
Charles

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Coastie

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IMHO one of the best ways to know what should be in your first aid/medical kit is to get some training. Red Cross first aid training is one that is offered just about everywhere. If you put something in your kit is good to know how to use it.

My first training was in the Boy Scouts. There we learned to use triangular bandages in many ways but that is something that you can't find in many stores. It easy to make them from old bed sheets. Just remember if you do that, it is not a sterile dressing. To make them start with a square piece about 40" by 40" and fold it to make a triangle and cut along the fold. I like to have three in any serious kit.

The two lists you guys provided are pretty good for most practical uses (again in my opinion because I'm not a doc.) The only thing that I saw missing from the lists was a petroleum gauze pad for use on a sucking chest wound. That item is something I remember from training from 20 years ago so it may not even be a current first aid procedure. Lacking that item, there are ways to improvise. I don't have one myself at this time.

Robert, for all the meds you have in your list. They should only be used for non-trauma first aid (comfort assistance.) For instance, don't give meds to a victim of a gun shot wound. Common sense? Maybe. (I need current training. Time to find a Red Cross course.)


"petroleum gauze pad for use on a sucking chest wound?"  Not recommended these days for sucking chest wounds....probably why you didn't see it on our lists.  For the EMT training we {my wife and I} (had 7 years ago) were taught to use a bandage (aka patch) that also had a plastic wrapper one would place over the wound.  The patch has to be at last 2 inches longer than the wound itself.  One also has to secure 3 sides of the patch with adhesive tape and leave one side un-taped, so the patch can "breath" as the patient breaths.  This one-way filter of sorts allows air to be expelled from the chest cavity while protecting the wound from outside air.

Charles1951

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"petroleum gauze pad for use on a sucking chest wound?"  Not recommended these days for sucking chest wounds....probably why you didn't see it on our lists.  For the EMT training we {my wife and I} (had 7 years ago) were taught to use a bandage (aka patch) that also had a plastic wrapper one would place over the wound.  The patch has to be at last 2 inches longer than the wound itself.  One also has to secure 3 sides of the patch with adhesive tape and leave one side un-taped, so the patch can "breath" as the patient breaths.  This one-way filter of sorts allows air to be expelled from the chest cavity while protecting the wound from outside air.

Thanks for straightening me out on that. My training is way outdated. So much so that my memory of it could be entirely wrong as well. Is not giving meds to a trauma patient still right?
Charles

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Coastie

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"petroleum gauze pad for use on a sucking chest wound?"  Not recommended these days for sucking chest wounds....probably why you didn't see it on our lists.  For the EMT training we {my wife and I} (had 7 years ago) were taught to use a bandage (aka patch) that also had a plastic wrapper one would place over the wound.  The patch has to be at last 2 inches longer than the wound itself.  One also has to secure 3 sides of the patch with adhesive tape and leave one side un-taped, so the patch can "breath" as the patient breaths.  This one-way filter of sorts allows air to be expelled from the chest cavity while protecting the wound from outside air.


Thanks for straightening me out on that. My training is way outdated. So much so that my memory of it could be entirely wrong as well. Is not giving meds to a trauma patient still right?

Charles, the one thing about first aid is that it changes regularly.  What you learned in the Boy Scouts, back in the day, was good in its day, and it taught you the basics. But this alone doesn't make you wrong - every thing changes over time, especially when your dealing with first aid. 

Look at CPR.  I'm sure what you learned in the Boy Scouts is a LOT different in what's taught today.  When I took the EMT course (7 years ago) the compression to breath rate then was 26:2; then in 2010 it was changed to 28:2, in 2011 they changed it to 30:0, and today its 100 compresions per minute.  Breaths aren't even taken into account, because they want to get the heart pumping, but some units do have a manual rebreather (air bag), it usually depends on how many individuals you have to perform CPR.  That one thing changes just about every year if not every 6 months.   It's changed drastically over the years and I am sure what you learned in the Boy Scouts isn't what is taught today.  Things, especially in first aid, change all the time.


As for giving a trauma patient meds.  Not the way we were taught.  However, a paramedic may respond differently as they're above a basic EMT.  If one is  trained to do IVs then, yes an IV would probably be stuck into a patients arm(s) to sustain them, build up blood/fluid loss during a ride to the hospital.  However, that may not be the case if we were to fly someone to a hospital, because some tasks can be better performed in the rear of an ambulance which doing the same in a helo or fixed wing ambulance can't.  It's all good.

Robert Harvey

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I have a family, 99% of the needs are going to be comfort, maybe once a life time I will need the gun shot wound portion of a med kit.
our med kit was built as needed.
which is why I asked the question, to see what might be needed for that 1%
As forces push our society down into chaos, the need for a major trauma bag will be greater.
In time we will get and maintain both. (as long as the feds do not take what we need off the market)
Also keep in mind some things will need to be replaced, as their potency dissipates over time.
We check ours every 6 months.
thanks
Robert

Time will tell.

Coastie

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Its a good idea to check it every 6 months!  Do your vehicles also have a first aid kit?  Maybe not the same as your home kit, but a small one if always nice to have along. 

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In addition to a first aid kit in each car, I have several Small trauma kits just to deal with firstaid for a Gun Shot wound. I keep one in each vehicle and one in my range bag. Each kit is the same. Each kit is in a large zip lock bag and containes:
A. Bleeding Control
1. C.A.T. Tourniquet
2. An Israeli dressing
3. 1ea packace of Quick Clot sponge
4. 1ea 4" ace bandage for direct pressure with #2above or #5below
5. 6ea 4X4 (Sterile)
6. N.A.R. "Z" pack gauze 3"X 4yds
B. Airway Management
1. Adult Oral Airway
2. Nasal Airway w/lube packet
C. PPE & Other
1. Post-it pad for any notes and a sharpie marker with a couple of feet of 2" tape wrapped around it (used in conjuction with Zip-Loc bag for an occlusive dressing).
2. 2pr of large Nitrile Gloves
3. Trauma Scissors.
*At one time I carried 2ea 14 gauge North American Rescue chest decompression needles, and an Asherman Chest seal but have since left them out. I also left out the CPR mask as I now plan to do Hands Only CPR until the ambulance arrives.     

 
« Last Edit: November 27, 2011, 02:07:18 PM by Coastie »
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While updating my survival box I had a chance to review my first aid kit and found it lacking in several areas.

Sometimes we forget about first aid kits and just how important they can be when facing a wilderness adventure - and I include being involved when the SHTF and any kind of injury may be not good.

I have several kits for the home and camping and build on them when I can. I wanted, however, a kit that was geared more toward the hunter as knife cuts, scrapes, and gunshot wounds would be more probable in a survival situation.

So, I went on a quest to find a better solution than what was in my survival box and I think that I stumbled across one; the "Hunters First Aid Kit" by Adventure Medical Kits. This kit supports 1 -7 people and is intended for:
•   Avid Hunters and Fishermen
•   Base Camp
•   Camping
•   Group Leaders
•   Guides/Outfitter Services
•   Overnight Hunting and Fishing Outings
Features include:
•   Laerdal® CPR Face Shield for protected mouth-to-mouth resuscitation
•   Detachable Field Trauma kit for trips away from basecamp.
•   Irrigation syringe and wound closure strips to clean and close wounds.
•   Petrolatum gauze promotes healing and doesn't adhere to deep puncture wounds.
•   Bright orange exterior with reflective piping makes kit easy to find when you need it.
•   A wide array of medications to treat pain, inflammation, and common allergies.
•   Hospital-quality tools, including EMT Shears and precision forceps set the standard for backcountry medical care.
•   Wide variety of wraps and bandages to immobilize fractures and provide support.
•   Trauma pads and wide elastic wraps to control life-threatening bleeding.
•   400d coated nylon fabric with water-resistant taped zipper.
One of my requisites was that the unit had to be compact and could be stuffed into a back back pouch for transport. It also had to be able to break down should I have to downsize for portability. This unit allows me to do that as the Field Trauma Kit can be detached and removed from the kit and attached to a belt or strap should I leave my base camp or have to skedaddle real quick.

Here is a full list of contents:

Bandage Materials
1 Bandage, Elastic, Self Adhering, 2"
2 Dressing, Gauze, Sterile, 2" x 2", Pkg./2
1 Bandage, Conforming Gauze, 3"
2 Dressing, Non-Adherent, Sterile, 3" x 4"
6 Bandage, Adhesive, Fabric, 1" x 3"
6 Bandage, Adhesive, Fabric, Knuckle

Bleeding
1 Gloves, Nitrile (Pair), Hand Wipe
1 Instructions, Easy Care Bleeding
1 Trauma Pad, 8" x 10"
1 Trauma Pad, 5" x 9"

Blister / Burn
11 Moleskin, Pre-Cut & Shaped (11 pieces)

CPR
1 CPR Face Shield, Laerdal

Duct Tape
1 Duct Tape, 2" x 50"

Fracture / Sprain
1 Bandage, Triangular

Instrument
1 Scissors, Bandage with Blunt Tip
1 Splinter Picker/Tick Remover Forceps
3 Safety Pins
2 Thermometer, Disposable

Medical Information
1 Comp. Guide to Wilderness & Travel Medicine

Medication
3 Ibuprofen (200 mg), Pkg./2
2 Aspirin (325 mg), Pkg./2
1 Instructions, Easy Care Medications
2 Diamode (Loperamide HCI 2 mg), Pkg./1
2 Antihistamine (Diphenhydramine 25 mg)
2 After Bite Wipe

Wound Care
6 After Cuts & Scrapes Antiseptic Wipe
1 Syringe, Irrigation, 20 cc, 18 Gauge Tip
1 Dressing, Petrolatum, 3" x 3"
1 Tape, 1" x 10 Yards
1 Instructions, Easy Care Wound
2 Tincture of Benzoin Topical Adhesive
1 Povidone Iodine, 3/4 oz
1 Wound Closure Strips, 1/4" x 4", Pkg./10
2 Cotton Tip Applicator, Pkg./2
3 Triple Antibiotic Ointment, Single Use

The only items that I added is Celox granules, the Celox Gauze Z-Fold, and tourniquets.

I purchased the kit from Survival Gear @ http://www.survival-gear.com/hunters-first-aid-kit.htm. The kit is $59.95 = S&H.

The kit size: 9" x 7" x 5" and weighs 1lb. 11oz. As shown below, the kit fits a SAW pouch perfectly and adding a extra layer of protection and M.O.L.L.E straps can attach to my pack, if need be. The SAW pouch was purchased through "The Sportsman's Guide" @ http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/s...&k=SAW+Pouches (Package of 2 for $19.95 [if you are not a member]). However, you can purchase them from other mil-surp retailers as well.

This system works perfectly for me and should take care of the most common injuries as well as having a detachable trauma pack for more serious stuff.

It may be worth looking at for your first aid needs.

I also have a larger and better equipped First Aid kit for everyday use around the house or as a grab bag in case of emergencies.
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Robert, a trauma/blowout kit is not just for gunshot wounds. There are a number of situations where the contents of a blowout kit would be needed other than a gunfight. Industrial accident or wrecked vehicle, for example.

Coastie, until severe bleeding is stopped, fluids will not be introduced; that's current practice. Even after bleeding is stopped and fluids are introduced, my understanding is that volume introduced is not as much as in the past.

Current practice for CPR is accurate; no more breathing for them is the new standard.

If you really want to learn about handling trauma and the new protocols, it's time for a plug for Trauma Medicine For The CCW Operator. You'll go over stopping the bleeding, restoring airway function, dealing with broken bones, immediate patient transport if necessary, the priorities of what to do when, all in the context and including basic training for the gunfight. It is applicable to more than the gunfight and will go far beyond any basic first-aid course the Red Cross will give you.
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Coastie

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One thing about CPR is that it is rare if you bring a patient receiving that back to life.  It is "rare" and we rejoice when one of our EMTs does that because it is so rare an occurrence that the patient will live.  (So be prepared now for that - knowing the possible outcome before you start won't be such a let down when it eventually happens). 
CPR is applied to keep the patients heart beating and brain function restored during the ambulance run from our area to any hospital is in the shortest amount of time at least 40 minutes; then to the better hospitals that may handle a trauma specifically it's 1:30 hrs. 

The direction we take is up to the patient, they regularly have a magnetized information (CD case we've passed out at numerous EMS events) holder on their fridge that tells us just about everything a patient wants to share with the 911 res-ponders (the meds their taking, who their doctor is, his hospittal, etc.).  So the driver doesn't know where they're going until the patient is being wheeled out to the truck.  Then, depending on the direction its heading, 2-3 extra EMTs or deputies or others may come along as CPR is extremely tiring and persons will have to be changed out on the run to the hospital.




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Taurian,

For an off-the-shelf kit, AMK makes some pretty good stuff. Their SOL survival line is also very good, being advised by Doug Ritter, who really is an expert. The main things I would add to the Hunter kit you have are:
- A SAM splint:
http://www.allmed.net/catalog/item/1,707,811,812

- More supplies in the Bandage and Bleeding sections. 1" gauze is especially handy for securing dressings on hands & feet but is very hard to find in the store. There is some here:
http://www.allmed.net/catalog/item/1,2497,2498,2976,2505

- At least one more triangle bandage, you can skip that if you always carry a good sized bandana.

I build my own kits and would probably upgrade the bandage scissors to EMT shears too. AMK is probably as good as you're going to find at a reasonable price point. There is better stuff out there but you get over $200.00 pretty fast and still have to be careful that you are buying stuff with good quality components.
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One thing about CPR is that it is rare if you bring a patient receiving that back to life.  It is "rare" and we rejoice when one of our EMTs does that because it is so rare an occurrence that the patient will live.  (So be prepared now for that - knowing the possible outcome before you start won't be such a let down when it eventually happens).  ...

Too true Coastie! I worked a guy with our local responders one day at my day job. Came back from lunch and he was having seizures in the conference room at the top of the stairs. I worked on keeping him from further injuring himself and help package him (1 officer, 1 EMT, 1 paramedic, 2 firefighters, 1 security guard, and myself  had all we could do to get him on the gurney and strapped in) and about that time he stopped breathing, went cyanic, and shortly thereafter, lost heartbeat. I worked the bag down to the ambulance and later learned he didn't make it. Was kinda tough and not something they can prepare you to deal with in a first aid class. Went over it umpteen thousand times in my head and couldn't find anything we'd done or not done according to all the training I'd had but it was still tough to accept.

On the flip side, a young man I know (15 years old) had a heart attack at home on a Saturday morning and his father was able to maintain CPR until the ambulance crew arrived. He is still with us and doing great today (implanted AED).
SARGeek

Coastie

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Yup, happens here all the time.  CPR on someone going to Colville (the closest hospital) only for them not to make it.  While one senior woman, another team was working on made it, and is still with us. 
I'd say it was up to the person(s) and maybe their overall health before the event, because the techniques we and the regular crews use is all the same. 

Echo_Four

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There was a post on survivalblog.com today that addressed this issue. While I don't agree with everything he says, I do think he makes a great point about people getting a little too carried away with medical kits, particularly when they don't have any training to go with it.

http://www.survivalblog.com/2011/11/gauze_and_water_a_combat_medic.html

SARGeek

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Echo_Four,

Good article. I do have band-aids as they are psychological first-aid for nine-year-olds on injuries that otherwise would be left open to the air once bleeding was stopped (i.e. "boo-boos"). But the author makes some great points. I would add blister prevention/treatment, sunscreen and other items that he probably considers "personal care" since normally the soldiers he's treating take care of that stuff themselves.

I will disassemble my current kit and drop a list here when I get some time.
SARGeek

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Recommended by Dr. Meade:
CAT-T or SWAT-T tourniquets. Yes, they're pricey. They're also what he recommends you depend on if you need one. This is not the kind of product you want to save money on with the cheap knock-offs.
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SARGeek

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Here's the kit that I evolved for backpacking, hiking, and outing with the kiddos. Also carry it for wilderness SAR even though I am not a medic. Please note that some items like insect repellant, sunscreen, chapstick and so forth are already covered separately in the daypack so I don't repeat them in the kit.

Don's First-Aid Kit 15 Dec, 2011

PPE
---
- Rescue Mask
- 2 Pr. Nitrile Gloves
- Hand Sanatizer

Tools
-----
- EMT Shears
- Splinter Forceps
- Tick Tweezers
- Small comact mirror

Bandage
-------
- 2, 3" Roll Gauze
- 2, 2" Roll Gauze
- 4, 1" Roll Gauze
- 2, Trainagle bandage w/2 Safety pins each.
- 1, 4" Ace Bandage
- 3, 2" Ace Bandage

Dressing
--------
- 5, 2"x3" non-stick pads
- Snack size ziploc with assorted Band-aids
- 2", 3", and 4" Gauze Pads

Meds
----
- Triple antibiotic
- Tums
- Pink Bismuth
- Ibuprofen
- Tylonal

Misc
----
- Quick Reference First-aid booklet
- Moleskin
- Heater pads (Glove warmers)

I have duct tape in the pack as well and usually would rather use gauze and tie it off than tape bandages in most situations that go beyond "Band-aid". The SAM splint is usually separate in the pack as it doesn't fit in the drybag that I store the kit in.

In light of some of the more recent training I've had and how far it is to walk out from some of the places I go I am considering adding sutures, some quick-clot, and a few other items. While my kit is a bit heavier on "staples" than the others, a similar kit is in each person in the family's daypack, both for hikes and other outings but also as a ready pack for each person.
SARGeek

GTG

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I think one not costly item that should be in your home, a Military Surplus Surgical Kit. G2G

http://www.otgready.com/Army-Surplus-Surgical-Set-p/sl80122.htm
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Coastie

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Some of my best first aid kits came from Surplus....

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I'm a trained trauma nurse, so my bag may be a bit overboard for some.  No need to carry what you don't know how to use.  I started by mixing a galls emt kit with a military issue first aid kit.  I added some basic meds like tylenol and benadryl.  Lots of assorted gauzes, bandages and slings.  A cervical collar kit, nasal airways, leatherman, good trauma shears, face mask for CPR, steri strips and more gloves then I would ever need.  I also strapped a flashlight to the kit in case of a night time emergency.  Can never have enough tape and a pen is always nice if you are monitoring vital signs (BP cuff and clock in kit).  The military issue kit has quick clot in it, but im leery of it.  Using it often leads to surgical debriedment later

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All good info here!  Thanks everyone for the tips and ideas!  I've been thinking seriously about beefing up our own first aid kits.  This info really helps! ;D
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Something I've noticed, so far no one's mentioned any sort of "on body" medical supplies they carry.

When outside the house I always have a emergency Celox compress on my person, (Generally in my Taclett pack or an inner coat pocket) along with a large bandanna to hold the dressing in place (Or serve as an emergency tourniquet) and a set of disposable rubber gloves.

The main use is as primary treatment for a gunshot/knife wound myself or a loved one/innocent by stander may incur during a self defense scenario until the EMT's can arrive.  (Which is why I carry the rubber gloves, to help prevent any potential blood borne disease transmission if treating a complete stranger.)

It's secondary use is in the event I ever find myself in the position to render immediate aid to an accident victim of some sort.

At home We have a more substantial first kit similar to the ones already listed, and a second kit in our bug out bag, which also contains extra supplies of Rosie's regular medication and extra prescriptions to fill them. (We have to get these unused scripts rewritten every 2-3 months by the doc when Rosie goes in for her regular diabetic/epileptic check up because of the time/date differential, but as long as we bring in the unused script to show it hasn't been filled, her doc is okay with writing a new one.)
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oldranger53

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About all I carry "on body" on a daily basis are band-aids in my wallet.
That is mainly because of what I call the "Hampton Family Curse".
If there is a sharp edge within a meter of wherever my hands are, somehow I'll get myself cut on it, and have to use a band-aid.
I wear gloves a lot for normal working conditions because of "the curse."


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Never shall I fail my comrades. I will always keep myself mentally alert, physically strong and morally straight, and I will shoulder more than my share of the task whatever it may be.  One hundred percent and then some.

Coastie

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I carry a small sized bag in my SUV at all times....it's completely stocked with everything an EMT might need in the field.  It's also small enough to carry without becoming tired or over-weighted.

SARGeek

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Good point Silveressa,

I am looking at upgrading to something like the Tactical Response VOK but changing out the T4 tourne-qwik for a C.A.T.

It also seems to be missing a chest seal per-se, but does have duct tape and plastic with which to improvise one.

I also have a few band-aids and such in the EDC bag so I don't have to run out to the car for my primary kit in case of a paper cut or some such. Includes prep pads with the band-aid kit for cleaning when soap and water isn't available.
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On thing a woman mentioned on the Doomsday Prepper's show, was maxi pads are sanitary & good for bullet wounds. G2G
'The illegal we do immediately; the unconstitutional takes a little longer.' Henry Kissinger

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SARGeek

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Actually, Maxi-pads are handy for any wound that requires a large absorbent dressing and they are more readily available in most locales than trauma pads.

Tampons have also been used successfully to pack larger wounds as they expand and help clotting.

Sorry if this makes folks uncomfortable but some of the taboos in our society are pretty ridiculous when it comes to that practicalities of saving a life. I don't talk about these things at the dinner table myself, but this isn't a discussion for the dinner table in the first place.
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Duct tape. Don't forget the duct tape.
Shikan haramitsu dai ko myo.

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SARGeek

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Duct tape. Don't forget the duct tape.

+1 Absolutely!

I think the VOK actually includes a 100" roll but it is vital for just about any injury from blister prevention to improvising a splint.

In line with this discussion is some very good info from a Doc countering some bad advice floating about in cyber-space. Take a look here:

http://www.warriortalk.com/showthread.php?100647-Bad-advice!!!
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CR Williams

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John Meade is a friend of mine and knows very much what he's talking about. If you're still on USCCA, he's the one doing the Video Tip about gunshot wounds for me.
Shikan haramitsu dai ko myo.

In Shadow In Light - Studying and advancing the art and the science of the fight.

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GTG

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John Meade is a friend of mine and knows very much what he's talking about. If you're still on USCCA, he's the one doing the Video Tip about gunshot wounds for me.

I am interested in watching that. G2G
'The illegal we do immediately; the unconstitutional takes a little longer.' Henry Kissinger

"A Nation Of Sheep Will Beget A Government Of Wolves" Edward D Murrow

"Either We Are A Country Of Laws With A Constitution, Or We Are A Banana Republic"

oldranger53

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Thanks!
Never shall I fail my comrades. I will always keep myself mentally alert, physically strong and morally straight, and I will shoulder more than my share of the task whatever it may be.  One hundred percent and then some.