Author Topic: Unintentional Discharge  (Read 6016 times)

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oldranger53

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Unintentional Discharge
« on: April 08, 2013, 01:47:49 PM »
An accidental or unintentional discharge of your firearm can be catastrophic and fatal, not to mention humiliating and could even be a trip to your local crossbar hotel.
This is a topic not often discussed, not here and not much of anywhere else, but I believe it deserves a mention at least.
I found a link to an interesting article on Personal Defense Network on this topic.


http://www.personaldefensenetwork.com/articles/tactics-defensive-issues/unintentional-discharges/?utm_source=April+5%2C+2013+Newsletter&utm_campaign=PDNnews040513&utm_medium=email


Basically, an accidental or unintentional discharge CAN happen to anyone, even the most experienced and seasoned gun enthusiast.
It is not something you want, so learn the basic rules and adhere to them.
Overconfidence is probably the number one point where these things happen.
No one is immune.  We are all susceptible.
Be careful out there!  The life you save may be your dog's, your kid's, or your wife's, or even your own!
Never shall I fail my comrades. I will always keep myself mentally alert, physically strong and morally straight, and I will shoulder more than my share of the task whatever it may be.  One hundred percent and then some.

Tadrian

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2013, 03:50:32 PM »
Good article.  Thanks for posting it!

In 50 years of handling a lot of guns I have had two unintentional discharges.  In both, no one and nothing was hurt...but my pride; and that, severely. Thank God in both cases the guns were pointed  safely, one at a target and one at a "discharge barrel".  Irrespective of that, both times I pulled the trigger, and instead of getting the expected "click", I got a surprising "boom!".  They were not good experiences, except for making me paranoid about never having another.  A little paranoia...or maybe more than a little when unloading or loading a weapon...can be a really good thing.

Everyday I write the truth to who I am by what I do.
Life achieves its summit, when it does the uttermost what it was equipped to do.
It's always easier to shift the responsibility of one's existence, to lean on others rather than stand alone, but I refuse to place my destiny in another's hands.

SARGeek

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2013, 04:18:37 PM »
I have not yet had a discharge when I didn't at least expect the possibility ("Am I out? BANG! Guess not...) and pointed the firearm accordingly. That said, familiarity breeds contempt and I have on occasion looked back on my actions and realized I hadn't *really* looked at that chamber or made a point of dropping the mag, even though I knew it was empty, before cycling a slide/bolt.

I like that the author points out that this is often the "elephant in the room" and many folks don't like to talk about it. But just like nobody is in condition yellow all the time (you have to sleep sometime) nobody has perfect gunhanding all the time but talking about it. Casually reminding our rangemates & shooting buddies, and generally making it a non-judgemental, non-confrontational, pen topic goes a long way toward building good habits and a safety culture. If it's OK to talk about it and folks don't get their backs up about reminders we're all safer.
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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2013, 07:41:55 AM »
Interesting Read, Thanks.
'The illegal we do immediately; the unconstitutional takes a little longer.' Henry Kissinger

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Taurian

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #4 on: April 14, 2013, 02:21:21 PM »
Good article!

I have had, in over 40+ years of handling firearms, one UD. It occurred at a range where I was asked, by the owner, to shoot a pistol and tell him what I thought of it - a 1st generation Glock G17 (circa 1982) that was set up for competition. At the time I did not care for Glock pistols, as the reports of UDs was pretty high by LE personnel. I had not handled one, let alone shot one. I was hesitant to shoot it, but compelled by curiosity to give it a try, nonetheless.

Placing the unloaded pistol on the firing table, I ran the target down to 15 yards; a distance that (I felt) would afford me a good range to evaluate the pistol.

I had already placed the slide in it's rearward and locked position, as was the rules for entering the range. I inserted a fully-loaded magazine and dropped the slide. The gun, the range, and I was now hot and I was slightly nervous.

I lined up the sights where I felt was a good starting point and placed my finger lightly on the trigger and the gun suddenly goes off. I dropped the magazine from the pistol, racked back the slide to clear it, and returned it to its owner. The gun was inherently too dangerous to shoot, with its ultra-light trigger, even in competition. It turned me off from Glock pistols for a very long time. No damage ensued and I actually did hit paper with it.

It was not until 2011 when I again shot a Glock pistol, a box-stock 2nd generation G17. With a 5.5 pound trigger, the gun was an entirely different animal and now I own several Glock pistols. Every time I pick one up; though, I'm reminded of that one UD; that is actually a good thing.
What most 21st Century Americans simply do not grasp is that the Constitution and Bill of Rights were not written to to give rights to the citizens of our then-new nation, but was instead written to tightly constrain the federal government.

GTG

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2013, 06:12:00 AM »
I never shot a super light trigger. I too would be shy.
'The illegal we do immediately; the unconstitutional takes a little longer.' Henry Kissinger

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"Either We Are A Country Of Laws With A Constitution, Or We Are A Banana Republic"

Tadrian

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2013, 06:20:07 AM »
I never shot a super light trigger. I too would be shy.

I shot a really light triggered one, owned by another guy, while at the range.  Wouldn't have one, nope, sure wouldn't.  Gave me the "gee whilies"!
Everyday I write the truth to who I am by what I do.
Life achieves its summit, when it does the uttermost what it was equipped to do.
It's always easier to shift the responsibility of one's existence, to lean on others rather than stand alone, but I refuse to place my destiny in another's hands.

SARGeek

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2013, 10:40:33 AM »
We had one of the boy's friends shooting a rifle he'd gotten from his grandfather at the range last summer. He was having trouble with it and asked my to try it out. I did, and heeding his warning that the "trigger is kinda light" I was cautious with it. It was under a pound, you hardly felt your finger touch before the round was on it's way. I advised him that the trigger was too light to be safe and he needed to get the rifle to a gunsmith to get it in working order. I agree with Taurian completely, a trigger that light does not give you positive control of where the bullet goes.
SARGeek

oldranger53

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #8 on: May 22, 2013, 04:09:40 PM »
We had one of the boy's friends shooting a rifle he'd gotten from his grandfather at the range last summer. He was having trouble with it and asked my to try it out. I did, and heeding his warning that the "trigger is kinda light" I was cautious with it. It was under a pound, you hardly felt your finger touch before the round was on it's way. I advised him that the trigger was too light to be safe and he needed to get the rifle to a gunsmith to get it in working order. I agree with Taurian completely, a trigger that light does not give you positive control of where the bullet goes.


Light trigger pull is undesirable to be sure.  I have never understood why someone would want a "hair trigger" on any firearm.  It doesn't make sense no matter how you look at it - unless you don't care where your bullet goes. ???


Would a .5lb trigger pull be better in a gunfight?
Would a 4lb trigger pull be better in a gunfight?
I just don't see the advantage of the "hair trigger".
I'd rather have a 15lb trigger pull for a dedicated weapon for gunfights.  No kidding.
Reflexes what they are, and target ID and commitment all consuming, well I'd rather have to REALLY squeeze the trigger and I'm sure there'd be no problem with 15lbs pressure.
Right now, my carry piece has a 12lb trigger pull.  IT's stiff, but I'll have to really commit to pulling the trigger, rather than merely think about it.  Big difference.
Never shall I fail my comrades. I will always keep myself mentally alert, physically strong and morally straight, and I will shoulder more than my share of the task whatever it may be.  One hundred percent and then some.

M1911A1

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #9 on: May 22, 2013, 05:05:48 PM »
Both of my competition pistols (see avatar photo) have three-pound triggers, as does my 1911 "shortie." That's about as low as I would ever care to go.
I have carried, and would still carry, any of those three pistols for self-defense purposes, since I am well used to that trigger pressure, and I can control my fingers quite well, thank you.

The reason for such a light trigger, particularly in competition, is that pressing it will not disturb the direction in which the gun is pointed. I believe that a three-pound trigger on a three-and-a-half-pound (loaded) gun is just about ideal.

However, since I have been pocket-holster-carrying for the past 14 years, I find myself feeling unsafe with a light-triggered, safety-levered pistol in my pocket. So I switched to a couple of DAO pistols with nine-to-15-pound triggers: My AMT .45 Backup, and Jean's P3AT, for instance. No problem—I'm adaptable.

And now I carry the Colt's Pocket Hammerless .380, but OWB in a holster. I'm back to a safety lever, but this pistol's trigger lets off at about five pounds. I'm OK with that, but the next time I let it go to someone else's house, its trigger is going to be lightened a lot—probably down to three-and-a-half pounds.
....................................

My go-to bolt-action rifle has a three-pound trigger. I used to hunt with a muzzleloader with a double-set trigger, giving me the choice of either three pounds or about eight ounces. (I never used the ultra-light set trigger on a deer, though—I never had enough time to set it. Squirrels, yes; deer, no.)
Steve,
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oldranger53

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #10 on: July 10, 2013, 12:03:49 PM »
I had an accidental discharge about 30 years ago.
I'd just traded a shotgun for a S&W Mod 38 Airweight, the one with the magnesium alloy frame, and hammer shroud.
The first day I owned it I was drawing back the hammer on loaded cylinders and my thumb slipped off the thing.
I had it pointed away from any possible habitation of humans, as I was up in the mountains of California.
I was shocked and ashamed of allowing that to happen, but it sure taught me to maintain a tighter focus on what my hands are actually doing while manipulating a pistol.
Why was I ashamed?  Well, some friends witnessed the event, and laughed at me, plus well it's just plain embarrassing in a situation like that. 
Imagine the shame a person would feel if some real damage occurred because of an accidental discharge!
Never shall I fail my comrades. I will always keep myself mentally alert, physically strong and morally straight, and I will shoulder more than my share of the task whatever it may be.  One hundred percent and then some.

oldranger53

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #11 on: July 18, 2013, 11:06:57 AM »
Just thought of another item, stored away in long term memory...

Year was 1959, I think.
I was a wee lad, yet gun aware and liking it.


Step-father had a 12ga pump shotgun under the bed, in a soft case, and zipper undone.
Whilst exploring the bedroom, no adults in the house, I discovered the shotgun.
Pulling it out from the unzipped case, hefted it, and while pointing at the wall, pulled the trigger.


Imagine my surprise when the gun went "bang!"


Ya shoulda  seen me try to lie my way out of that one when the adults saw the hole in the wall and the paint can (what was left of it) on the other side of the wall later that day!


Oh my.  The next day, my step-father bought me my first gun.  I guess he figured it would be better if I had my own, rather than to seek out and explore his!


Forgot about that story till lately.

Be careful with your firearms!  Ya never know what young-un's will do when no adults are around!
Never shall I fail my comrades. I will always keep myself mentally alert, physically strong and morally straight, and I will shoulder more than my share of the task whatever it may be.  One hundred percent and then some.

LEJoe

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #12 on: July 18, 2013, 01:20:53 PM »
Consider blocking things like that out of your mind a rare gift.  ;D

oldranger53

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #13 on: July 18, 2013, 05:33:36 PM »
Consider blocking things like that out of your mind a rare gift.  ;D


I agree.  Blocking mode enabled.
Never shall I fail my comrades. I will always keep myself mentally alert, physically strong and morally straight, and I will shoulder more than my share of the task whatever it may be.  One hundred percent and then some.

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #14 on: July 18, 2013, 05:45:14 PM »
..
Oh my.  The next day, my step-father bought me my first gun.  I guess he figured it would be better if I had my own, rather than to seek out and explore his!

...

I think this is the key to kids and guns.  My son has been shooting since he was 4 (bb gun of course), .22 rifle at 6, .22 handgun at 7, and on.  He's now 13 and has shot quite a variety of weapons.  He is capable of handling most on his own, and he cleans his own now.  To the best of my knowledge, he doesn't mess or play with the guns while we're away, and I trust that he will not.  In fact, he gets rather upset if he sees someone else mis-handling a firearm (i.e. not pointed in a safe direction, finger on trigger, etc).   I'm just debating on when to clue him in on the hidden-in-house handgun, just in case he truly needs it. 

Training, training, training.....  Then pray to God that we only ever use them for training and/or sport.

Robert Harvey

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #15 on: July 19, 2013, 08:06:33 AM »
..
Oh my.  The next day, my step-father bought me my first gun.  I guess he figured it would be better if I had my own, rather than to seek out and explore his!

...

Training, training, training.....  Then pray to God that we only ever use them for training and/or sport.
Amen!
Time will tell.

SARGeek

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #16 on: July 19, 2013, 08:35:38 AM »
..
Oh my.  The next day, my step-father bought me my first gun.  I guess he figured it would be better if I had my own, rather than to seek out and explore his!

...

I think this is the key to kids and guns.  My son has been shooting since he was 4 (bb gun of course), .22 rifle at 6, .22 handgun at 7, and on.  He's now 13 and has shot quite a variety of weapons.  He is capable of handling most on his own, and he cleans his own now.  To the best of my knowledge, he doesn't mess or play with the guns while we're away, and I trust that he will not.  In fact, he gets rather upset if he sees someone else mis-handling a firearm (i.e. not pointed in a safe direction, finger on trigger, etc).   I'm just debating on when to clue him in on the hidden-in-house handgun, just in case he truly needs it. 

Training, training, training.....  Then pray to God that we only ever use them for training and/or sport.

My kids get kinda twitchy at the range when bad gin handler are around too. My only concern with making a gun available to them as would be as they head into the teen angst and the skewed perspective that allows one to really believe in their heart of hearts that being grounded is the end of their life. I sat down with my 18 year-old recently on this topic and explained that the drama was generating serious concerns. He assured me that it was a lot of noise over stuff he knew was not as important as he was making it out to be and it has since calmed down quite a  bit. Teen suicide is still a serious issue, tied also to things like bullying and parents who are not paying attention, and I would hate to leave him the tools that would turn a momentary urge into a tragedy.


"Trust to the Lord but keep your powder dry" is an old, old axiom that applies as much in parenting as anywhere else. If I ever feel that the kids don't have enough self-control to deal with a gun then the guns will be out of ready access at our home for them until that changes. Not a huge deal, simply moving the pan away from the fire a bit so notyhing gets burned during a flare up. But these things are something you have to pay attention to, such monitoring isn't automatic.

In the meantime, 13 is early for that level of angst but plenty grown up enough to have better judgement than many adults. If you are confident in his ability to deal with the responsibility, for now at least (pre-hormone storm if you will), then brief him in and walk him through some scenarios. Here are a few suggestions, you will have to judge for yourself how to deal with this but speaking as a parent and an NRA certified instructor I'd factor these into my plan for my own kids at this age:
1. Keep the sessions short. Kids' attention spans won't be long enough for the whole subject at once.
2. Allow time for questions. Further shortens what you can cover at once but important for them to "own" the info.
3. Have a plan for them, several in fact based on whether or not you are home and what the most likely scenarios are.
4. Allow them some input to the plan. They will buy in to it more and you may be surprised what their uncluttered mind will see that you might have unknowingly made an assumption about. You can even leave some deliberate choice points for them like "Would you be more comfortable grabbing the gun and running out the back door if there is more than one and the opportunity presents itself?" and "Where would you go?" Things like that.
5. Cover the important stuff but don't get fancy. Kids don't usually go for lots of detail in action plans and will disregard them when under pressure.
6. Run through some stuff with airsoft. That will make the training fun and they will be far more likely to react how they trained with you.

Just a some thoughts. We can take it to another thread if you want to talk more about this and bat some ideas around. It's a worthy topic for all parents & grandparents as far as I'm concerned.
SARGeek

mjpell

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #17 on: July 20, 2013, 06:55:20 PM »
Excellant discussion and great points!  Thanks much for the time to write that up.

Thus far he's pretty level-headed and pre-hormone stage.   But I agree on your points.  I have a daughter who I'd never hand a gun to.   She's, well, let's just say stuck in the middle of the teenage hormone hateful part of life (and should be several years past it).  She's out of the house, so that part is behind us.

I'd far far far rather he simply escape any bad situation.   That's going to be best for all of us.   But I also recognize the possibility of it not happening that way. 

He can physically handle the gun. Mentally handling a situation, and the aftermath is certainly another story. 

I think this is a topic well worth expanding on.

As a side note, this week he earned his BSA rifle badge (.22).     :)

Cheers!
Mike

..
Oh my.  The next day, my step-father bought me my first gun.  I guess he figured it would be better if I had my own, rather than to seek out and explore his!

...

I think this is the key to kids and guns.  My son has been shooting since he was 4 (bb gun of course), .22 rifle at 6, .22 handgun at 7, and on.  He's now 13 and has shot quite a variety of weapons.  He is capable of handling most on his own, and he cleans his own now.  To the best of my knowledge, he doesn't mess or play with the guns while we're away, and I trust that he will not.  In fact, he gets rather upset if he sees someone else mis-handling a firearm (i.e. not pointed in a safe direction, finger on trigger, etc).   I'm just debating on when to clue him in on the hidden-in-house handgun, just in case he truly needs it. 

Training, training, training.....  Then pray to God that we only ever use them for training and/or sport.

My kids get kinda twitchy at the range when bad gin handler are around too. My only concern with making a gun available to them as would be as they head into the teen angst and the skewed perspective that allows one to really believe in their heart of hearts that being grounded is the end of their life. I sat down with my 18 year-old recently on this topic and explained that the drama was generating serious concerns. He assured me that it was a lot of noise over stuff he knew was not as important as he was making it out to be and it has since calmed down quite a  bit. Teen suicide is still a serious issue, tied also to things like bullying and parents who are not paying attention, and I would hate to leave him the tools that would turn a momentary urge into a tragedy.


"Trust to the Lord but keep your powder dry" is an old, old axiom that applies as much in parenting as anywhere else. If I ever feel that the kids don't have enough self-control to deal with a gun then the guns will be out of ready access at our home for them until that changes. Not a huge deal, simply moving the pan away from the fire a bit so notyhing gets burned during a flare up. But these things are something you have to pay attention to, such monitoring isn't automatic.

In the meantime, 13 is early for that level of angst but plenty grown up enough to have better judgement than many adults. If you are confident in his ability to deal with the responsibility, for now at least (pre-hormone storm if you will), then brief him in and walk him through some scenarios. Here are a few suggestions, you will have to judge for yourself how to deal with this but speaking as a parent and an NRA certified instructor I'd factor these into my plan for my own kids at this age:
1. Keep the sessions short. Kids' attention spans won't be long enough for the whole subject at once.
2. Allow time for questions. Further shortens what you can cover at once but important for them to "own" the info.
3. Have a plan for them, several in fact based on whether or not you are home and what the most likely scenarios are.
4. Allow them some input to the plan. They will buy in to it more and you may be surprised what their uncluttered mind will see that you might have unknowingly made an assumption about. You can even leave some deliberate choice points for them like "Would you be more comfortable grabbing the gun and running out the back door if there is more than one and the opportunity presents itself?" and "Where would you go?" Things like that.
5. Cover the important stuff but don't get fancy. Kids don't usually go for lots of detail in action plans and will disregard them when under pressure.
6. Run through some stuff with airsoft. That will make the training fun and they will be far more likely to react how they trained with you.

Just a some thoughts. We can take it to another thread if you want to talk more about this and bat some ideas around. It's a worthy topic for all parents & grandparents as far as I'm concerned.

SARGeek

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #18 on: July 22, 2013, 12:49:02 PM »
Excellant discussion and great points!  Thanks much for the time to write that up.

Thus far he's pretty level-headed and pre-hormone stage.   But I agree on your points.  I have a daughter who I'd never hand a gun to.   She's, well, let's just say stuck in the middle of the teenage hormone hateful part of life (and should be several years past it).  She's out of the house, so that part is behind us.

I'd far far far rather he simply escape any bad situation.   That's going to be best for all of us.   But I also recognize the possibility of it not happening that way. 

He can physically handle the gun. Mentally handling a situation, and the aftermath is certainly another story. 

I think this is a topic well worth expanding on.

As a side note, this week he earned his BSA rifle badge (.22).     :)

Cheers!
Mike

...

NOTE: Quote shortened for brevity...  :P

Great news on the BSA badge! I am qualified (although not currently registered) to teach that and working with kids is very rewarding when teaching firearms.

I've started a new thread here:
http://guntoters.com/index.php/topic,5664.0.html

So this one can continue life as it is and we can take the new discussion over there. Come on, come all, let's hash out some details and make some good ideas happen!
SARGeek

crzyjarmans

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #19 on: August 22, 2013, 07:10:43 AM »
Thanks for the link, good article, I don't think I'm immune to a negative discharge, or an unintentional discharge, I have been handling firearms for more than 20 years, And "knock on wood" haven't had a ND/UD, I always handle the firearm in the same manner, Have very strict rules when It comes to handling a firearm, And will not bend my rule for anyone.

there have been time's when I have allowed someone to handle my firearm, but not before  I safety'd the fire by removing mag, locking the slide open and double and triple checking to assure there isn't any ammo in the firearm, Did this same thing when a police officer asked to see my EDC, When I safety'd the firearm, He asked me why I did that? And he was a police officer that had training with firearms, My reply was, No disrespect intended, but I never hand someone a firearm without first making sure the firearm is safe to handle, He said he thought that was a great mindset to have when it comes to gun safety
Shawn, Stay armed, Stay safe

Robert Harvey

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #20 on: August 22, 2013, 08:35:59 AM »
1
Time will tell.

CedarElm7

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #21 on: September 20, 2013, 11:11:25 AM »
I had one with a shotgun when I was 13 years old, quail hunting in New Mexico in 1965 with my Dad and younger brother.  Fortunately, no one was even close to being hit or hurt, but if had a major effect on me and the importance of safety and paying attention.  It still comes to my mind to this day every time I shoot.
Brad

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Taurian

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #22 on: September 21, 2013, 01:04:12 PM »
An acquaintance at work shared this story:

He was at his hunting camp where it is, when not actively hunting, mandatory to unload firearms prior to coming into the camp house.

He was in his bedroom that he shared with his son. He noticed that his son had placed his (the son's) hunting rifle on the bed. Wanting to take a nap, he was going to move the rifle when he noticed that the safety was off. He pressed the safety to "on" and the rifle discharged. The .243 round went through the wall of the bedroom and then went through the passenger side door and driver side door of a truck that was parked next to the building. The round then proceeded to go through the doors of a second truck that was parked next to the first truck. The round was never found.

I asked him if the rifle was a Remington 700 (as we know the Remy 700 had some safety issues). He said that he didn't know. All he knew was that the round going through what it did, children playing in the area, and adults just milling around, the result could have been worse.

I wondered why he just didn't pull the bolt back to check and clear (if necessary) the firearm. I decided not to ask him, as he seemed embarrassed enough when recounting his experience.
What most 21st Century Americans simply do not grasp is that the Constitution and Bill of Rights were not written to to give rights to the citizens of our then-new nation, but was instead written to tightly constrain the federal government.

crzyjarmans

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #23 on: September 22, 2013, 08:41:38 AM »
hopefully, that was a lesson learned, to always double check to assure that a firearm is empty, not just assume that it is
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CedarElm7

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #24 on: September 22, 2013, 07:25:04 PM »
Great point, crzyjarmans.

As a rule of thumb, if I haven't checked a gun to make sure it's unloaded within the last sixty seconds, it has then become a loaded gun until I've checked it again.

The only criticism I have of my obsession on this issue is that sixty seconds may be too long a time for me to retain the "unloaded" assumption.
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oldranger53

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #25 on: January 10, 2014, 07:39:44 AM »
<snip>

As a rule of thumb, if I haven't checked a gun to make sure it's unloaded within the last sixty seconds, it has then become a loaded gun until I've checked it again.

<snip again>


I agree with this.
Every time I "gun up" for the day, or "gun down" for bed at night, I habitually check for condition of the action, check for being loaded or unloaded, and check that nothing has blocked the action since last inspection.
Wife has not said anything about it, but I get the idea that she may think I'm a bit OCD about the whole thing.  That's ok with me.  OCD is not always a bad thing!
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CedarElm7

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #26 on: January 10, 2014, 08:51:48 AM »
Absolutely, Ranger!

I'm don't have OCD about too many things, but I sure have it with regard to checking the guns.
Brad

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oldranger53

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #27 on: March 13, 2014, 12:24:04 PM »
I came across a video on youtube about this topic today.


I'll try to embed it here.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_WTjjPyd2s" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N_WTjjPyd2s</a>

Testing.
OR53


ok, so I guess I'll post the link instead.


http://youtu.be/N_WTjjPyd2s 


Here ya go.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2014, 12:49:55 PM by Robert Harvey »
Never shall I fail my comrades. I will always keep myself mentally alert, physically strong and morally straight, and I will shoulder more than my share of the task whatever it may be.  One hundred percent and then some.

LEJoe

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Re: Unintentional Discharge
« Reply #28 on: March 13, 2014, 02:09:29 PM »
"EVERYBODY is a Range Safety Officer when they see something that is unsafe". Agreed.