Author Topic: Timing the shot  (Read 934 times)

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CR Williams

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Timing the shot
« on: April 02, 2012, 07:09:46 AM »
This can be done as part of practice with the full drawstroke or just isolating the extension to firing position. From the holster or from the close-ready/contact-ready or #3 position of a standard drawstroke, extend the gun to toward you point of aim as you move the finger to the trigger (if it's not there already) and begin to apply pressure. Goal is to have the shot break just as the gun comes to rest or just barely before the point of full extension. Start this slowly and don't try to force the timing or point of the break. If it doesn't happen by the time you're at extension, make note of that and adjust pace and timing and application of pressure to the trigger until you're breaking the shot at the point of or barely prior to the point of extension.

This isolation drill emphasizes the concept of 'driving the gun' to the focal point. Some will use the analogy of punching for the extension, but this is the wrong model to use for this application. Punches are meant to move through the target, not to the target, and if you punch a gun out it is likely to come to an abrupt halt that will throw the barrel off line and your shot with it. Instead, drive the gun like you drive a car, accelerating and decelerating to arrive at the point of the shot in time with the break of the trigger.

This should be done first dry, then you can run the drill with live-fire on the range.
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Bill MO

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Re: Timing the shot
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2012, 04:34:19 PM »
CR, I find in the driving of the gun to spot on target if you don't lock the elbow helps. Drive to full extension but not to a straight arm and locked elbow, locking the elbow seen to cause a dip in the gun (for me anyway). I'm getting old enough my elbow doesn't like to be straight anyway.

Focus on a small spot on target drive the gun to it. If you are point shooting you will find your hit to be close to the spot, if you bring the gun up to use sights you'll find the sights being close to the spot also.
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CR Williams

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Re: Timing the shot
« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2012, 02:38:28 PM »
I don't like locking the elbows in general, Bill. That puts force and stress on the structure. If I don't lock out, recoil doesn't transmit directly up the arm through the bone and the gun can float a touch. I believe it makes it easier to let the gun move naturally on recoil and promotes better return to shooting position and follow-through.
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