Author Topic: What's the story with all copper HPs?  (Read 1810 times)

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Leonidas

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What's the story with all copper HPs?
« on: January 21, 2012, 11:45:36 PM »
I've seeen them at the gun shop and advertised by Wilson Combat--160 grain all copper .45 HPs.  I assume from the weight that velocity over a 185 gr or a 230 gr would be substantial, but what about penetration?  Won't these tend to fragment?  What can anyone tell me about these new bullets? I haven't seen any reviews or write ups.

Coastie

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Re: What's the story with all copper HPs?
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2012, 09:20:03 AM »
I, myself, had to look these up, as they were new to me.
They're called
"designer" bullets.  Maybe these pages will
give you more info:


https://www.google.com/search?sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8&q=Wilson+Combat--160+grain+all+copper+.45+HPs

"Wilson Combat now has one too. ... The all copper bullet will
not separate core from jacket as it is one
.... .45 ACP: Barnes XPB
160 & 185 gr JHP (copper bullet) Federal..... Then again the same
gun would have problems with many of the
HPs on the market....
230
grain ball worked just fine in the military. ..." (1911 Forum-
choice 2 of above link)

Leonidas

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Re: What's the story with all copper HPs?
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2012, 11:11:23 PM »
Thanks, that was useful. All I found was that they had significantly higher velocities.  I like shooting 185s (on the rare occassion I can find them), but these were a whole new deal.

pop pop

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Re: What's the story with all copper HPs?
« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2012, 07:34:07 AM »
The Barnes all copper bullets have been around for years. In hunting they ar almost legendary. They are very effective and most all big companies have used them in rifle bullets for some time now. Cor Bon put them in handgun ammo and I think several of the other companies have some in the ammo lines as well.

They are really good bullets although the copper weighs less than led so they are larger bullets with less overall weight. The Cor Bon DPX is a premium bullet with a premium price. But they will bloom (expand) like a star after firing into water jugs and also will penetrate deeper than anything I have ever used. They are "almost" guarenteed to expand out of any handgun they are fired from. Many or the "writers" speak very favorably of their reliability of expansion and power.

I have used them for a couple years now.  I tested them in water jugs filled with water and got the most penetration of any ammo I used. They penetrated into the 5th jug and punched a very small hole in the very back but did not go through, but was retrieved in that jug. Nothing else I have ever fired out of my 2" snubbie has penetrated into the 5th jug. Winchester Bonded PDX1 came in second and penetrated into the 4th jug. Everything else (Speer, Winchester, Remington Federal) penetrated into the 3rd jug and some filled with terrycloath and blew through all 7 jugs with no expansion at all. The DPX out performed all.

Federal has come out with a new Bonded Critical Duty Ammo, but the article I read said it was for Police use only and they were Not going to sell it to the public at this time. It is for barrier penetration and supposed to be the best at shooting through glass and steel  while retaining most of the bullet weight with expansion.   

The all copper  bullets also retain 99.9% of their weight. IMO the best that we can purchase. I use them in my 357 mag as they are a mid rang recoil bullet and follow up shots are much easier when using them. Read up on them and you will see what I am talking about, but if you should decide to purchase some be ready to pay up to 2.00 per round for a 357 mag or 38 spl round for the DPX locally. I did order some from Midway, on special sale, for 28.00 per box of 20 with 9.99 shipping for 7 boxes. Federal has an all copper loading but I don't know how expensive they are. 

Coastie

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Re: What's the story with all copper HPs?
« Reply #4 on: January 23, 2012, 09:28:52 AM »
I was also thinking about these bullets
as most of the ammo I have in my ammo locker
have copper bullets on them, and yet with the run on
ammo these days (since 2008) I've noticed that some
9mm, .45 and others have lead bullets.  Guess that's
the economy and maybe since copper is hard to come
by these days?  Are the copper headed ammo the same
as the ones you're talking about all?  Or...

pop pop

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Re: What's the story with all copper HPs?
« Reply #5 on: January 23, 2012, 05:32:17 PM »
Coastie, I am not sure of you question. If you are asking if the bullets are all copper then the answer is yes. Most bullets are either all lead with a few traces of other metals or lead core with a copper jacket encasing the lead. The Barnes bullets are primarially  all copper.

CR Williams

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Re: What's the story with all copper HPs?
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2012, 06:11:50 AM »
I think the bullet design is still called the Barnes-X, but I may be wrong. It's used in the Corbon DPX round. I believe this is sometimes called a 'unitary' round because it isn't constructed from two or more different materials. It is said to offer superior expansion characteristics especially after penetrating barriers. It's always lighter in a given caliber because otherwise they would have to elongate the bullet to meet the weight, which would make for problems chambering it in some guns. It is expensive, yes, but a magazine-full up front is not a bad idea.

If you can't afford to or don't want to go with DPX or it's relatives, then a bonded round is preferable for overall performance under the widest range of conditions (of counteroffensive shooting, that is).
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