Author Topic: Fall Traveling  (Read 134 times)

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pop pop

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Fall Traveling
« on: October 29, 2018, 07:29:52 AM »
We are back from our 6 week trip to all the New England states and ending with a 9 day stay in Pigeon Forge, TN. No we did not see a lot of fall foliage, but did see some in S Vermont and Gatlinburg.

We did not take our EDC's because it was too risky for many of the northeastern states did not recognize our right to do so legally. I was totally uneasy, but obeyed the laws of those states that denied our concealed carry, or not even being able to have a gun in our RV, or hollow point ammo in a one state. Some did not allow over 10 in magazines so we just complied with their laws.


We were really surprised by 2 things. One was there was not a lot of traffic in the northeast and the toll road situation was unreal. We spent over 250.00 in paying tolls to ride on public highways and even I-95 was a toll road in southern Maine. I knew there were some toll roads, however did not count on spending that much money in paying tolls.


All in all we had a wonderful uneventful trip. We visited every state in the northeast. Fuel was a lot higher up there than we were accustomed to pay here in mid TN. We have now been in every state, in the lower 48, except for 3. Oregon, California and Nevada. That is on the bucket list for next summer.


Will be shutting down camping until "Possibly" a trip in Jan or Feb down south to visit my sister that has breast cancer that has metastasized. Also have two daughters down there, one in Punta Vedra Fla, and the other in Mt Pleasant S C. L/w we will be spending a week with each after visiting my sister in Sebring, Fla.


Drove a little over 4,500 miles in 6 weeks, and the trip cost us a little over $4,700. which included a bunch of shopping. My truck averaged about 14 miles per gallon of fuel and the cost averaged about 3.39 per gallon.


Seen a lot of beautiful sights and visited a lot of American History. Never would have dreamed we would be doing this in my early 70's. We simply had a wonderful time.

Edited to add;  We eat lobster in Maine. I paid 14.99, for a 1 1/2 lb lobster, in Freeport Maine. Large was 14,99, medium was 13.99, and small was 12.99. Also visited the flagship L L Bean retail store and took a picture by the large Main Hunting Boot on display just outside the front entrance.

M1911A1

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Re: Fall Traveling
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2018, 02:04:28 PM »
Welcome back!

I grew up in the Northeast, in New York (city and state) mostly, with lots of time spent in Vermont, New Hampshire, and Connecticut.

It's a beautiful area, even in the buggiest of summers...as long as you bring mosquito and horse-fly repellent. It's at its most beautiful in mid-fall, when the maples have gone bright red. I'm sorry that you missed most of the spectacle of the annual change.


The season to avoid, of course, is Mud, the time between winter and spring. For the season of Mud, rich northeasters go to Florida...or even Tennessee.

I am also familiar with the Great Smoky Mountains, having entered from the Gatlinsburg area several times with Californian friends who retired to the husband's family-origin area in Loudon County, Tennessee. It's as beautiful, and as buggy, as any similar area in New England...but warmer.

When I was a kid, my mother would insist, at least once a year, upon chowing-down on a "shore dinner." This used to be cooked in a fire pit lined with stones, the necessary steam coming from a thick seaweed liner. The feast included lobster, clams, potatoes, and corn-on-the-cob. By the time my family could afford such a thing, you had to get it in a specialty restaurant...and the fire pit was no longer involved.

Me? I prefer corned beef hash, made fresh in the morning from the remnants of a New England boiled dinner (corned beef, potatoes, carrots, and onions, all boiled together in a pot).
Steve,
retired leathersmith and practical shooter


"Qui desiderat pacem, pręparet bellum."

NorCalChuck

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Re: Fall Traveling
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2018, 05:32:24 PM »
So now we know, Steve is a closet Irish Man . . . .
Eating to much corned beef automatically makes you Irish you know.
Sometimes when I eat to much of it I begin to talk with an Irish accent . . . .
Heck Siri on my cell phone didn't even understand me one time!
"We will have a good government as long as those that govern are effected by those laws that they pass. When those that are passing the laws are no longer effected by those laws then they will no longer pass good laws."

M1911A1

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Re: Fall Traveling
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2018, 06:20:56 PM »
Sorry, Chuck...
We Jews are equal to the Irish, in the consumption of corned beef.
It's just that we eat ours on rye bread.

But only Presbyterian New Englanders admit to eating New England boiled dinners...
...And the corned beef hash which inevitably follows.
Steve,
retired leathersmith and practical shooter


"Qui desiderat pacem, pręparet bellum."

pop pop

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Re: Fall Traveling
« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2018, 08:11:28 AM »
Steve, we really enjoyed New England. The mountains were beautiful. My family is from the Applications of eastern KY, and my sister always said, "You can take the boy out of the mountains, but you can't take the mountains out of the boy." She is right,  I love them and have always gravitated to the call of them. My favorite road is the Blue Ridge Parkway. 

Guys please allow me to shed some light on our camping. We have a 35' 5th wheel RV and I pull it with a Chevy Duramax Diesel with the Allison Transmission. The RV weighs 8,900 lbs dry weight and has approx. 2,000 lbs. of extra camping gear in it. The heavy duty truck handles the weight very well. It has the double cab with the long 8' bed which gives the truck a extra long wheel base so it is fairly stable driving down the road. I can drive with the cruse set on and it has the power to hold the desired speed without too much shifting down on hills. The truck is a single wheel, in rear, and is a 2500 HD and I purchased it local from another RV owner and it had 90,000 miles on it. These trucks engines are good for about 300,000 miles, and transmissions about 150 to 200,000 miles, without a lot of mechanical problems. Of course one must do periodic oil, filter and lube on them to achieve these mileages.

I had no mechanical problems on the road. I do try and keep the truck and RV in good condition to avoid road problems. I spent my childhood camping with my father on hunting and fishing outings. We started with tent camping, then went to pop up camper, and finally my father purchased a 28' Argosy camping trailer. The Argosy was a painted version of a Airstream which has the chrome exterior.

I purchased a used 30' Hornet pull behind trailer, in 2004, right before I retired from the Post Office. I did not know if my wife would enjoy camping so I got into it slowly. She does and we have 6 grandchildren who love to accompany us on adventures. We plan our summers with them in mind. We even had our youngest daughter, and her family, fly in and join us in Boston on this trip. They traveled to Maine also. They eat lobster with us in Freeport then had to leave to get our 2 youngest grandchildren( 9, 6), back in School in South Carolina, where they now live. We drove on to Arcadia Nat Park and eat more lobster in Bar Harbor Maine.

We have ended up with the used 35' two bedroom 5th wheel Wildcat which I paid $9,200 for used last year. A new Wildcat cost 60, to 90,000.00 and up. We have traveled to most of the lower 48 states and have plans, L/w, to hit the last 3 next August. We have really enjoyed our travels and feel blessed to be able to still do it. We have gone places and done things we would have never done if we had not purchased the campers. It cost us an average of $30.00 per night, on this 7 week trip, to rent spaces to park our "plaice on wheels" at night. We would have averaged well over $100.00 per night for hotel and motel rooms in all these heavy tourist locations. Bar Harbor alone is 250.00 per night. 

I have been a good shopper and don't have a tremendous amount of money tied up in our trailer and truck. My son in law has helped us in this area, as he is a good mechanic, and does all my maintenance and repairs. My truck was in a fire in Pigeon Forge TN 2 years ago, and it melted the front end of the truck. We purchased it for $7,200.00 an spent $3,000.00 repairing it. After we were done the truck's book's worth was 27,000.00 so you can see it helps to be a good mechanic, or know one. New ones go for 50,000 up to $80,000.

Let me also say I have a good "Camp Chef" camp stove and I can cook a good/great meal in 15 minutes. Steak, hot dogs, spaghetti and meat balls, burgers, and fries go a long way with children, and they always taste better when eaten outside beside a roaring camp fire.

This is why I say, "We are blessed to be able to travel."


You don't need to start with the set up we have. If you have a young family and have any extra money, do get them into camping. You can purchase a tent for a small amount of money at Wal Mart. It is a tremendously fun thing for young and old children to do.  Our grandkids, and even our grown kids, love to camp with us now. I will say at 70, I can no longer rough it in a tent. I encourage you to try it. You will be surprised how much fun it really is and there is a lot a very safe places to camp. Most tent campsites cost 10.00 per night and they have water and electric plus bathhouses for necessities and comfort. I have even seen tents with a small air conditioner sticking out a window. Go figure!!! One can even legally take his EDC for protection in most parks now.


I encourage you to just drive to a camping destination near you, and check it out. I promise you, you will be surprised.