Author Topic: Gurkha's knives  (Read 607 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

oldranger53

  • The Ranger Creed-words to live by
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3725
  • 2/503d INF ABN 173d BDE ABN
    • Temporary website home with basic information.
Gurkha's knives
« on: March 18, 2017, 01:44:41 PM »
Hello one and all,
A couple days ago I was reading through the older blogs on the GT Blog site (if you're not familiar with it, check it out, lots of good information there!)

A Ka-bar fixed blade is reviewed there.  Link follows...
http://guntoters.com/blog/2011/11/22/ka-bar-tdi-law-enforcement-knife-the-long-version/

Anyway, while reading that review and thinking about blade design, etc... I decided to make the jump into that odd-angled realm and order a "specialty" blade of my own.
It arrived, day before yesterday.



I'm trying to insert it into the text but it may be at the end.  We'll see when I post this thread.

This particular knife is NOT expensive, less than $30.00.  However, the blade and handle are one piece of steel, and the wood grips are riveted into the steel with very large brass rivets.
As you can see, the steel comes polished fairly well, and the edge is ready for a "real" edge to be applied.
I have only one (maybe two) gripes.
The main one is that I would wish for the scabbard to hold the knife blade more securely while sheathed.  It kinda flops around.  I'd worry about it falling out, should I ever get "horizontal" during some kind of altercation.  So, I'll need to find some modification that will hang onto the knife better while in the scabbard.

Now, before the inevitable discussion arises about "cost" and "brand name", (you know the discussions I'm talking about), I wish to point out that a bad guy, bear, enemy, drug dealer, thug, home invader, wolf, robber, et al...bleed equally well from a piece of jagged glass, a $300.00 "name brand" blade, or a $30.00 deal from Amazon (which this is/was).
As far as longevity goes, I'll say that if a $30.00 Gurkha clone saves one's butt, even once, then it's served it's purpose.  Moreover, if a guy plans on needing a fighting blade for more than once (like say, being a professional knife fighter <gag>) then he could have ten of these for the price of one of those $300.00 "name brand" ones out there.
On the down side, all it has on the blade is a fairly shallow "India" applied to the base of the blade.  No "name brand" to brag about to one's friends.

So here's an affordable, functional, Gurkha clone from the "odd-angle" realm.  And hey!, it looks way better in person than in the pictures. I haven't weighed it, but I'll bet it's close to 2lbs...it's pretty darned heavy anyway, and it balances pretty close to just forward of the grips.

You too, can have one if you haven't yet dumped Amazon.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2017, 09:10:35 AM by oldranger53 »
Never shall I fail my comrades. I will always keep myself mentally alert, physically strong and morally straight, and I will shoulder more than my share of the task whatever it may be.  One hundred percent and then some.

M1911A1

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3668
  • Location: I'm at the far upper left-hand corner of the US.
Re: Gurkha's knives
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2017, 05:58:20 PM »
I worry about your temper, when you find that your new knife's blade doesn't have one.

Sharpen it up, and try a few cuts. Bamboo is a good target, if it's held in place securely.
(There must be lots of bamboo, out there in warm and tropical Montana.)


Years ago, one of our club members, a Sikh warrior, presented us with a practical opportunity to defend ourselves with a Webley .455 revolver and a very sharp Talwar (an Indian sword).
The revolver held six shots. There were seven targets. Time was an issue.
What we learned:
1. It's hard to hit anything with a revolver, when you're hanging onto a sword with your other hand.
2. It's extremely hard to behead a person with a sword. (The stand-in for the person was a bundle of bamboo, which very closely approximates a human neck.)
Steve,
retired leathersmith and practical shooter


"Qui desiderat pacem, pręparet bellum."

oldranger53

  • The Ranger Creed-words to live by
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3725
  • 2/503d INF ABN 173d BDE ABN
    • Temporary website home with basic information.
Re: Gurkha's knives
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2017, 06:49:53 PM »
Ok Steve, I'll check my "temper" at the door!

http://www.khukuriblades.com/catalog/

Going by the site linked above, the "real thing" doesn't cost all that much either.  Looks like a "real" Army issue odd-angle knife is less than $50.00 if I read correctly. 
Been a while since I've seen any bamboo growing around here.  Probably have to order some!

EDITED:

I went back and looked at the product description and purchaser's reviews.  Here's the link...

Genuine Gurkha Kukri Knife https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00F2ISW32/ref=cm_sw_r_em_apap_ZpTwdDhukzMTB

One of the reviewers claims to have "tested" the blade composition (or something).

I'll try to find some things to do my own tests on, like bamboo...Or ?
« Last Edit: March 20, 2017, 09:07:54 AM by oldranger53 »
Never shall I fail my comrades. I will always keep myself mentally alert, physically strong and morally straight, and I will shoulder more than my share of the task whatever it may be.  One hundred percent and then some.

Taurian

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7610
  • Location: About 3,546 Miles S.E. of Nome Alaska
Re: Gurkha's knives
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2017, 07:02:03 AM »
I have been a  fan of this blade design for many years, and have several Gurkha Kukri knives to attest to that fact.  They are original knives and I had four of them, which has since been reduced to three.  The one that was sold to a friend (who just had to have it) had a blade length of 30" and weighed over four pounds. This size of kukri is used to behead water buffaloes with a single stroke for the traditional Gurkha sacred ceremony.  Only one is issued to each Gurkha Regiment in India. The three remaining knives are about eighteen inches in blade length and would be carried by the individual soldier.  The Kukri typically comes in either a decorated wooden scabbard or one which is wrapped in leather. Traditionally, the scabbard also holds two smaller blades: an un-sharpened chakmak to burnish the blade, and another accessory blade called a karda.

I also have a Cold Steel version of the Kukri, and it is very sharp.

I have longed for another ceremonial Kukri; it was a very interesting topic of conversation, let alone very useful if I was ever attacked by a Water Buffalo - or attacked by someone who was ranting about snack bars.
What most 21st Century Americans simply do not grasp is that the Constitution and Bill of Rights were not written to to give rights to the citizens of our then-new nation, but was instead written to tightly constrain the federal government.