Author Topic: 'Drawing' the rifle  (Read 907 times)

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CR Williams

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'Drawing' the rifle
« on: November 05, 2016, 05:57:38 AM »
Just for long guns:

The fastest accurate shot you can make from a fully slung position, hands off. Simple as that until you try it. I've worked it dry but I can't remember doing it live.

Thing is, on the rare cases you'll have a long gun you won't always have it in your hands. Going from the sling or any patrol/casual carry position is the equivalent of a reactive draw from the holster with a pistol and I think we need to work on it some. (Another chapter for volume six, perhaps. I know I'm not at five yet, but I'm working on that and already have the subject list for that one.)

Run it slow and dry first and make sure you pay attention to where the muzzle is going. This could get hairy in a hurry otherwise.
Shikan haramitsu dai ko myo.

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M1911A1

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Re: 'Drawing' the rifle
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2016, 02:28:38 PM »
Suggestion: Try carrying the rifle slung on the weak-side shoulder, muzzle down.
(It might be useful to put a condom or a finger-cot over its muzzle, to keep dirt out.)

Grab the forestock in your weak-side hand, fingers toward your rear and thumb down.
Now you can slip the sling off of your shoulder and, in one smooth rotational move and without much manipulation, end up with the rifle shouldered and your weak-side arm in a "hasty sling" support.
At one point, you have to let go of the forestock in order to properly wrap your weak-side hand in the sling, but by then your strong-side hand should've already grabbed the rifle's pistol-grip.

Try it (slowly, please) and see if it suits you.
Steve,
retired leathersmith and practical shooter


"Qui desiderat pacem, pręparet bellum."

Taurian

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Re: 'Drawing' the rifle
« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2016, 03:43:25 AM »
I tried drawing my new rifle, but this was the best that I could do:

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What most 21st Century Americans simply do not grasp is that the Constitution and Bill of Rights were not written to to give rights to the citizens of our then-new nation, but was instead written to tightly constrain the federal government.

Taurian

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Re: 'Drawing' the rifle
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2016, 04:23:00 AM »
It would also seem that the type of sling will matter; single-point, two-point, three-point. Couple this with how the rifle is slung (muzzle up, muzzle down, cross carry, shoulder carry, etc.) and things can get hairy for sure.

I will normally sling my long gun on my shooting side. Assuming a conventional over-shoulder slung long gun, with the muzzle up, the shooting hand pushes upward on the butt of the gun as the support hand grabs the forearm. The support hand pulls the gun forward and horizontal to the ground, as the shoulder (the left in my case) drops to allow the firing arm and hand to clear the sling.  The shooting hand then comes over the top of the long gun and takes up its place for shooting on the stock.  The support hand maintains its grip on the forearm (or pump handle as it may be) and the gun is positioned for shooting.  This gets me into a basic, shouldered shooting position.  If I need to better stabilize the firearm, the support hand can release the forearm (in the case of a rifle/carbine) and intertwine with the sling before resuming its position on the forearm.  This method works pretty well with two-point and three-point slings.

I have found that an overhand grip with the support hand is best for getting the long gun initially off of the shoulder. once the shooting hand has a hold of the stock, the support hand can rotate to a normal forearm support position.

I have watched a number of videos on the subject of positioning a long gun from slung position and they are very entertaining, but hardly useful, for the most part.  The best approach is the simplest approach.

And, that's my $0.02 for this morning.
What most 21st Century Americans simply do not grasp is that the Constitution and Bill of Rights were not written to to give rights to the citizens of our then-new nation, but was instead written to tightly constrain the federal government.