Author Topic: An exercise to help you with shooting  (Read 817 times)

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CR Williams

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An exercise to help you with shooting
« on: June 22, 2016, 06:13:32 AM »
When shooting from a static position unsupported you want a structure that will transmit the recoil of the weapon into the ground. It is the same principle as a reverse punch in karate just in the reverse. Power flows up from the ground in one case and down into the ground in another.

In this and cases where you are moving but not dynamically (steady-state or stop-start) it helps to be able to set the grip from the shoulder out. This exercise, a Reverse Kettlebell Shoulder Press, will help you develop strength from shoulder to hand so you can do that.

You will need either a kettlebell or a dumbbell small enough to hold by one end (start light with this because of the need to get balance correctly). Take the kettlebell up and set it upside-down (bottom pointing directly up) at shoulder level and press directly upward and back for your chosen number of repetitions. Shift to the other side and repeat. With a dumbbell you will have to hold it by one end and balance it vertically. It's easier and I think does move for the grip to use a kettlebell for this one.

The difference between this and a standard dumbell shoulder press is the additional emphasis it puts on the forearm/wrist/hand because of the need to keep the kettlebell reversed vertically. This should translate pretty well into a better grip, better set and structure from shoulder to hand, and better recoil management when shooting handguns.

I'll eventually get some photos up of the exercise. Otherwise, that's it. Enjoy.

« Last Edit: June 23, 2016, 06:13:43 PM by CR Williams »
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Taurian

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Re: An exercise to help you with shooting
« Reply #1 on: June 22, 2016, 08:34:16 AM »
I would only add that some arm, wrist, and shoulder rotations should be done to warm up prior to the actual lifting.

I look forward to images, CR.
What most 21st Century Americans simply do not grasp is that the Constitution and Bill of Rights were not written to to give rights to the citizens of our then-new nation, but was instead written to tightly constrain the federal government.

CR Williams

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Re: An exercise to help you with shooting
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2016, 06:09:54 PM »
[attachimg=1]

This is it. Note the position of the kettlebell. This is why it works the hand, wrist and forearm like it does. You could do this with a dumbbell if you balance it vertically. Standard dumbbell presses won't work the forearms, wrists and hands like this does.

Note: This is the lightest kettlebell I have and when I started this I did five repetitions. That was all I could handle at the time. I'm doing better now. Start light with this and make sure of control of the weight throughout the movement.
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Taurian

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Re: An exercise to help you with shooting
« Reply #3 on: June 24, 2016, 05:05:44 AM »
What, in your opinion, would be a good starting weight?

Considering that most pistols weigh very light these days, and even RCPs (Rifle Caliber Pistols) are not all that heavy, maybe 3-5 pounds might be a good starting point?
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CR Williams

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Re: An exercise to help you with shooting
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2016, 05:48:27 AM »
What, in your opinion, would be a good starting weight?

Considering that most pistols weigh very light these days, and even RCPs (Rifle Caliber Pistols) are not all that heavy, maybe 3-5 pounds might be a good starting point?

I would not go less than five pounds and would suggest trying ten. Part of that depends on where you're at now with condition of the shoulder and overall conditioning. I started (and am still working with) twenty pounds but I already had a conditioning basis for that. Without that I would have either used a five-pound dumbbell (small enough at the end to hold vertical) or obtained a ten-pound kettlebell.
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Taurian

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Re: An exercise to help you with shooting
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2016, 06:03:35 AM »
What, in your opinion, would be a good starting weight?

Considering that most pistols weigh very light these days, and even RCPs (Rifle Caliber Pistols) are not all that heavy, maybe 3-5 pounds might be a good starting point?

I would not go less than five pounds and would suggest trying ten. Part of that depends on where you're at now with condition of the shoulder and overall conditioning. I started (and am still working with) twenty pounds but I already had a conditioning basis for that. Without that I would have either used a five-pound dumbbell (small enough at the end to hold vertical) or obtained a ten-pound kettlebell.

Thanks and good information!
What most 21st Century Americans simply do not grasp is that the Constitution and Bill of Rights were not written to to give rights to the citizens of our then-new nation, but was instead written to tightly constrain the federal government.