Cold Steel Walking Stick

Since my latest surgeries made it a challenge to walk without assistance for a short time, I have called on several friends of mine. No, they are not my shooting companions, but this friend could be used for shooting if called upon. I am talking about a walking stick or staff.

Cold Steel has a fine line of walking sticks and canes. My favorite; however, is the Blackthorn Walking Stick followed by the Blackthorn Staff, which is followed by the Dragon Walking Stick (because I like dragons). This review is about my favorite, the Blackthorn Walking Stick shown below.

Some Basics:

Part #: 91PBS
Weight: 29.3 oz.
Thickness: 1”
Blade Length: No
Handle: No
Steel / Material: High-impact Polypropylene
Length Overall: 37″
Additional Feature: No
Price: $49.99

As you can read from the table, the walking cane is made from polypropylene, but not just any polypropylene. No Sir! This is breaking a block of ice and smashing watermelons polypropylene (in case you are attacked by a block of ice or a watermelon). And speaking of melons, this waking stick could lay a knot the size of Manhattan on one made of flesh and bone – two-legged or four-legged. But, back to my purposes for the walking stick since I am a non-violent sort.

The cold steel walking stick is impervious to temperature extremes and at 5’ 11” the length of 37” is perfect for supporting me as I take my Tim Conway “Old Man” strides for a bit. And in fact, it comes in quite handy just as a carry stick when it is not needed for support. The Cold Steel Walking Stick, obviously, is not your average cane, and being a walking stick, it is not considered to be a martial arts weapon.

Constructed to look like Irish Blackthorn, the walking stick has some serious texture to it at well below the cost of an authentic Irish Blackthorn walking stick.

The ball of the walking stick fills the hand for a sure grip. I usually wrap my fingers under the lip of the ball for the best grasp (no jokes, please). When not used for support, the walking stick is carried with the head down and the stick resides along my forearm.

It should be quite obvious that the walking stick can be used for other things than to assist you in your walking, and that is as a tool for self-defense.  With a little bit of training using the walking stick, you will find that it is quite capable of being used as an impact tool and one that can do some serious damage to ligaments and such. Two resources that I would recommend for ‘basic training’ is; Cane Fighting: The Authoritative Guide to Using the Cane or Walking Stick for Self-Defense and Stick Fighting: Techniques of Self-Defense.

At 29.3 ounces in weight, the walking stick is not light, but because of that weight it is your friend. Momentum and mass count for a lot and you can build plenty of momentum with the walking stick once you learn how, the mass of the stick will do the rest.

I have added a rubber foot to my walking sticks and staff for additional grip.

The Cold Steel Blackthorn Walking Stick, Blackthorn Staff, or Dragon Walking Stick could also be used as a firearm support just as you would for any other walking stick, but that is a topic for a different discussion.

Resources:

Irish Blackthorn Walking Stick: https://www.coldsteel.com/products/walking-canes-by-cold-steel/irish-blackthorn-walking-stick-2101.html

About Taurian

Taurian is an Oath Keeper, veteran, former LEO and Defensive Tactics Instructor. Until retirement, Taurian had over forty-seven years of experience as a Technical Writer and Training Program Developer. After leaving home at the age of ten without any shoes, Taurian continues on with many years devoted to the keeping and bearing of arms.

One Response to Cold Steel Walking Stick

  1. Steve says:

    I, too, use a stick, but only for longer walks, for instance over about a half-mile.
    My stick is made of African thorn, and is, um, textured somewhat like blackthorn, although with more and smaller points.
    My stick has a “shepherd’s crook” handle, which I prefer to a knob because I swing my stick as I walk, using it for support only for every second left-foot step. (I carry my stick in my right hand, to aid my damaged left foot.)

    I have a very small knowledge of épée fencing, thus I have found that my stick works very well in the parry-and-thrust mode.
    It also works well for thrashing, being very flexible, but when one thrashes or slashes, the recovery time works against you. Thrusting works better.

    While your stick probably would make an excellent quarterstaff, mine is too light and flexible for that. Thus, I am, um, stuck with thrusting.

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